EUROPAM

European Public Accountability Mechanisms

Latvia

Country score (European Average*)
  • 86(66) Political Financing
  • 88(53) Financial Disclosure
  • 75(37) Conflict of Interest
  • 49(59) Freedom of Information
  • 59(62) Public Procurement

Country Facts

IncomeHigh
GNI per capita (2011 PPP $)23670.30
Population, total1960424.00
Urban population (% of total)67.36
Internet users (per 100 people)79.89
Life expectancy at birth (years)74.12
Mean years of schooling (years)11.7
Global Competitiveness Index4.4
Sources: World Bank, UNDP, WEF.

Political Financing

The Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties) (1995, amended 2014) and the law on Pre-election Campaign (2013) Before the Saeima Elections and Elections to the European Parliament (2004, amended 2009) are the main laws regulating the funding of political parties in Latvia.

There are comprehensive limits on the private income of political parties. Donations from foreign entities, corporations, trade unions and anonymous donors are prohibited as well as others specified in the law. There are also limits on the amount that can be donated.

Public funding is available for political parties and is allocated according to the votes received in the previous election. There are specific rules regarding what the public funding may be utilized for and those roles include pre-election campaigns and ongoing party activities. Indirect forms of funding include subsidized media access, premises for campaign meetings and space for campaign materials.

For regulations on spending, there are bans on vote buying and on some state resources being used in favour or against a political party or candidate. There are also limits on the amount a political party or candidate can spend.

Parties are required to provide accounts annually which must be made public and reveal the identity of donors. The accounts are overseen by the Corruption Prevention and Combating Bureau. Sanctions for breaches of provisions include fines, the loss of public funding, deregistration of the party, suspension of the political party and criminal law sanction.


Quantitative Data

Primary Metric

20122015201620172020Trend
Bans and limits on private income9494949494
Public funding7575757575
Regulations on spending100100100100100
Reporting, oversight and sanctions7575757575

Values lie in range between 0 and 100, higher values implying higher legislation comprehensiveness


Qualitative Data

We are frequently reviewing and refining our data, so in case you notice any mistake in our assessment, feel free to send us an email by clicking the button ()

Bans and limits on private income

Bans on donations from foreign interests

Is there a ban on donations from foreign interests to political parties? Yes. (1) In accordance with the restrictions referred to in Section 6 of this Law, political organisations (parties) may accept gifts (donations) from: 1) Latvian citizens; 2) persons who in accordance with law have the right to receive an Aliens passport of the Republic of Latvia; (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 4)
Is there a ban on donations from foreign interests to candidates? Yes. The pre-election expenses of a candidate are considered as the expenses of the party. This means that they are subject to the same rules on donations. (4) If a list of candidates is submitted by a registered or unregistered association of political organisations (parties), the expenses borne for the purpose by the political organisations (parties) that have formed such association, shall also be considered as pre-election expenses thereof. (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 8.‌4(4))

Bans on corporate donations

Is there a ban on corporate donations to political parties? Yes. (1) In accordance with the restrictions referred to in Section 6 of this Law, political organisations (parties) may accept gifts (donations) from: 1) Latvian citizens; 2) persons who in accordance with law have the right to receive an Aliens passport of the Republic of Latvia; (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 4)
Is there a ban on corporate donations to candidates? Yes. The pre-election expenses of a candidate are considered as the expenses of the party. This means that they are subject to the same rules on donations. (4) If a list of candidates is submitted by a registered or unregistered association of political organisations (parties), the expenses borne for the purpose by the political organisations (parties) that have formed such association, shall also be considered as pre-election expenses thereof. (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 8.‌4(4))
Is there a ban on donations from corporations with government contracts to political parties? Yes. (1) In accordance with the restrictions referred to in Section 6 of this Law, political organisations (parties) may accept gifts (donations) from: 1) Latvian citizens; 2) persons who in accordance with law have the right to receive an Aliens passport of the Republic of Latvia; (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 4)
Is there a ban on donations from corporations of partial government ownership to political parties? Yes. (1) In accordance with the restrictions referred to in Section 6 of this Law, political organisations (parties) may accept gifts (donations) from: 1) Latvian citizens; 2) persons who in accordance with law have the right to receive an Aliens passport of the Republic of Latvia; (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 4)
Is there a ban on donations from corporations with government contracts to candidates? Yes. The pre-election expenses of a candidate are considered as the expenses of the party. This means that they are subject to the same rules on donations. (4) If a list of candidates is submitted by a registered or unregistered association of political organisations (parties), the expenses borne for the purpose by the political organisations (parties) that have formed such association, shall also be considered as pre-election expenses thereof. (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 8.‌4(4))
Is there a ban on donations from corporations of partial government ownership to candidates? Yes. The pre-election expenses of a candidate are considered as the expenses of the party. This means that they are subject to the same rules on donations. (4) If a list of candidates is submitted by a registered or unregistered association of political organisations (parties), the expenses borne for the purpose by the political organisations (parties) that have formed such association, shall also be considered as pre-election expenses thereof. (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 8.‌4(4))

Bans on donations from trade unions

Is there a ban on donations from Trade Unions to political parties? Yes. (1) In accordance with the restrictions referred to in Section 6 of this Law, political organisations (parties) may accept gifts (donations) from: 1) Latvian citizens; 2) persons who in accordance with law have the right to receive an Aliens passport of the Republic of Latvia; (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 4)
Is there a ban on donations from Trade Unions to candidates? Yes. The pre-election expenses of a candidate are considered as the expenses of the party. This means that they are subject to the same rules on donations. (4) If a list of candidates is submitted by a registered or unregistered association of political organisations (parties), the expenses borne for the purpose by the political organisations (parties) that have formed such association, shall also be considered as pre-election expenses thereof. (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 8.‌4(4))

Bans on anonymous donations

Is there a ban on anonymous donations to political parties? Yes. (1) Financing of political organisations (parties) in the form of anonymous gifts (donations) is prohibited. (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 7)
Is there a ban on anonymous donations to candidates? Yes. The pre-election expenses of a candidate are considered as the expenses of the party. This means that they are subject to the same rules on donations. (4) If a list of candidates is submitted by a registered or unregistered association of political organisations (parties), the expenses borne for the purpose by the political organisations (parties) that have formed such association, shall also be considered as pre-election expenses thereof. (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 8.‌4(4))

Other bans on donations

Is there a ban on state resources being given to or received by political parties or candidates (excluding regulated public funding)? Yes. (1) In accordance with the restrictions referred to in Section 6 of this Law, political organisations (parties) may accept gifts (donations) from: 1) Latvian citizens; 2) persons who in accordance with law have the right to receive an Aliens passport of the Republic of Latvia; (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 4)
Is there a ban on any other form of donation? Yes. (1) Natural persons are prohibited to finance political organisations (parties) from gifts and loans of other persons. Natural persons, who have been sentenced with a prohibition to candidate for elections of the Saeima, European Parliament or local government, except for rehabilitated persons or whose conviction has been extinguished or set aside, are prohibited to finance political organisations (parties) by gifts or donations. (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 6(1))

Donation limits

Is there a limit on the amount a donor can contribute to a political party over a time period (not election specific)? Yes. The total payments of membership fee, joining fee and gifts (donations) performed by a member for one political organisation (party) may not exceed 50 minimum monthly salaries within a period of one calendar year. (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 3)
Is there a limit on the amount a donor can contribute to a political party in relation to an election? No. Absent from legal framework
Is there a limit on the amount a donor can contribute to a candidate? Yes. The pre-election expenses of a candidate are considered as the expenses of the party. This means that they are subject to the same rules on donations. (4) If a list of candidates is submitted by a registered or unregistered association of political organisations (parties), the expenses borne for the purpose by the political organisations (parties) that have formed such association, shall also be considered as pre-election expenses thereof. (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 8.‌4(4))

Public funding 

Eligibility criteria for direct public funding to political parties

Eligibility criteria for direct public funding to political parties: Share of votes in previous election Yes. (1) State budget financing shall be granted to a political organisation (party) for which more than two percent of voters have voted in the previous Saeima elections, in the amount of 0.71 euros in a calendar year for each vote acquired. ( Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 7.‌1(1))
Eligibility criteria for direct public funding to political parties: Representation in elected body No. Absent from legal framework
Eligibility criteria for direct public funding to political parties: Participation in election No. Absent from legal framework
Eligibility criteria for direct public funding to political parties: Number of candidates No. Absent from legal framework
Eligibility criteria for direct public funding to political parties: Share of seats in previous election No. Absent from legal framework
Eligibility criteria for direct public funding to political parties: Share of votes in next election No. Absent from legal framework
Eligibility criteria for direct public funding to political parties: Registration as a political party No. Absent from legal framework
Eligibility criteria for direct public funding to political parties: Share of seats in next election No. Absent from legal framework
Eligibility criteria for direct public funding to political parties: Number of members No. Absent from legal framework
Eligibility criteria for direct public funding to political parties: Other No. Absent from legal framework

Allocation calculations for direct public funding to political parties

Allocation calculations for direct public funding to political parties: Proportional to votes received No. Absent from legal framework
Allocation calculations for direct public funding to political parties: Equal No. Absent from legal framework
Allocation calculations for direct public funding to political parties: Proportional to seats received No. Absent from legal framework
Allocation calculations for direct public funding to political parties: Flat rate by votes received Yes. (1) State budget financing shall be granted to a political organisation (party) for which more than two percent of voters have voted in the previous Saeima elections, in the amount of 0.71 euros in a calendar year for each vote acquired. ( Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 7.‌1(1))
Allocation calculations for direct public funding to political parties: Share of expenses reimbursed No. Absent from legal framework
Allocation calculations for direct public funding to political parties: Proportional to candidates fielded No. Absent from legal framework
Allocation calculations for direct public funding to political parties: Number of members No. Absent from legal framework
Allocation calculations for direct public funding to political parties: Other No. Absent from legal framework

Earmarking provisions for direct public funding to political parties

Earmarking provisions for direct public funding to political parties: Campaign spending Yes. (1) A political organisation (party) is entitled to spend State budget financing on: 7) pre-election campaigns. ( Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 7.‌4(1))
Earmarking provisions for direct public funding to political parties: Ongoing party activities Yes. (1) A political organisation (party) is entitled to spend State budget financing on: 3) work remuneration and other payments to natural persons connected with the operations of the relevant political organisation (party) or the operations of the association of the relevant political organisation (party); ( Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 7.‌4(1))
Earmarking provisions for direct public funding to political parties: Intra-party institution No. Absent from legal framework
Earmarking provisions for direct public funding to political parties: Other Yes. (1) A political organisation (party) is entitled to spend State budget financing on: 1) premise hire and services connected to premise hire, including the organisation of meetings; 2) communication and Internet services; 4) sworn auditor services; 5) research work; 6) the organisation of educational events intended for inhabitants, including public events, seminars, charity events, and the publication and distribution of books, booklets, excluding the ensuring of catering services; and (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 7.‌4(1))

Allocation criteria for free or subsidized access to media for political parties

Allocation criteria for free or subsidized access to media for political parties: Equal Yes. 6(1) Deputy candidates who are on the list of deputy candidates of the same title have rights to use the State ensured free of charge broadcasting time for the pre-election campaign in the first television and radio programme of the public electronic mass media in cases, in accordance with the procedures and within the amount set out in this Chapter. 7(1) Deputy candidates who are in the list of deputy candidates of the same title have the right before the elections of the Saeima, the European Parliament and the elections of local governments to use the State ensured free of charge broadcasting time for pre-election campaign in the first television and radio programme of the public electronic mass media four times for five minutes in the period from the 25th day until the penultimate day before the election day. 7(2) If the Saeima is dissolved or recalled, deputy candidates who are in the list of deputy candidates of the same title have the right to use the State ensured free of charge broadcasting time for pre-election campaign in the first television and radio programme of the public electronic mass media two times for five minutes in the period from the seventh day until the penultimate day beofre the election day. (Law on Pre-Election Campaign, 2013, amended 2014, Sections 6(1) and 7, )
Allocation criteria for free or subsidized access to media for political parties: Number of candidates No. Absent from legal framework
Allocation criteria for free or subsidized access to media for political parties: Share of seats No. Absent from legal framework
Allocation criteria for free or subsidized access to media for political parties: Share of votes in preceding election No. Absent from legal framework
Allocation criteria for free or subsidized access to media for political parties: Other No. Absent from legal framework ( )
Are there provisions for free or subsidized access to media for candidates? Yes. 6(1) Deputy candidates who are on the list of deputy candidates of the same title have rights to use the State ensured free of charge broadcasting time for the pre-election campaign in the first television and radio programme of the public electronic mass media in cases, in accordance with the procedures and within the amount set out in this Chapter. (Law on Pre-Election Campaign, 2013, amended 2014, Section 6(1), )

Are there provisions for any other form of indirect public funding?

Provisions for any other form of indirect public funding: Premises for campaign meetings Yes. 25. State authorities and authorities of derived public persons and capital companies, in which more than 50 per cent of capital shares (stocks) belong to the State or derived public persons, may grant premises to the campaigner where to organise meetings with voters free of charge or for payment which does not exceed the actual maintenance expenses of such premises. (Law on Pre-Election Campaign, 2013, amended 2014, Section 25)
Provisions for any other form of indirect public funding: Space for campaign materials Yes. 24(1). It is prohibited to place and distribute the materials of pre-election campaign in the premises of the buildings where State authorities and authorities of derived public persons and capital companies, in which more than 50 per cent of capital shares (stocks) belong to the State or derived public persons, are located, as well as in the shared-use facilities of such buildings. 24(2). This restriction shall not apply to the materials of informative nature by the Central Election Commission on the elections of the Saeima, elections to the European Parliament and the elections of local governments, as well as to the cases referred to in Section 25 of this Law. (Law on Pre-Election Campaign, 2013, amended 2014, Section 24)
Provisions for any other form of indirect public funding: Tax relief Yes. 5. Natural persons who have, in compliance with the provisions of this Law, given (donated) financial resources or property to a political organisation (party) shall be exempted from payment of the relevant State fees. (Law on financing of political organisations (parties), 1995, amended in 2014, Section 5)
Provisions for any other form of indirect public funding: Free or subsidised transport No. Absent from legal framework
Provisions for any other form of indirect public funding: Free or subsidised postage cost No. Absent from legal framework
Provisions for any other form of indirect public funding: Other No. Absent from legal framework
Is the provision of direct public funding to political parties related to gender equality among candidates? No. Absent from legal framework
Are there provisions for other financial advantages to encourage gender equality in political parties? No. Absent from legal framework

Regulations on spending 

Is there a ban on vote buying? Yes. For a person who knowingly commits hindrance of the right to freely elect members of the parliament and to be elected or to freely participate in a national referendum organised in accordance with the laws of the Republic of Latvia, by the use of violence, fraud, threats, payoffs, or other unlawful means, the applicable punishment is deprivation of liberty for a term not exceeding three years or temporary deprivation of liberty, or community service, or a fine. (Criminal Law, 1998, amended 2013. Section 90(2))
Are there bans on state resources being used in favour or against a political party or candidate? Yes. 24(1). It is prohibited to place and distribute the materials of pre-election campaign in the premises of the buildings where State authorities and authorities of derived public persons and capital companies, in which more than 50 per cent of capital shares (stocks) belong to the State or derived public persons, are located, as well as in the shared-use facilities of such buildings. 24(2). This restriction shall not apply to the materials of informative nature by the Central Election Commission on the elections of the Saeima, elections to the European Parliament and the elections of local governments, as well as to the cases referred to in Section 25 of this Law. 1. The purpose of this Law is to ensure that the financial resources and property of the State and local governments is utilised lawfully and in conformity with the public interest, to prevent the squandering and ineffective utilisation of such financial resources and property, as well as to restrict corruption of State officials.‌ ( Law on Pre-Election Campaign, 2013, amended 2014, Section 24 Law On Prevention of Squandering of the Financial Resources and Property of the State and Local Governments, 1995, amended 2001, Section 1)
Are there limits on the amount a political party can spend? Yes. There are different limits for Parliamentary, Local Government and European Parliament election expenses. Section 8.4 provides comprehensive detail too long to include in this table. (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014,Section 8.‌4)
Are there limits on the amount a candidate can spend? Yes. (4) If a list of candidates is submitted by a registered or unregistered association of political organisations (parties), the expenses borne for the purpose by the political organisations (parties) that have formed such association, shall also be considered as pre-election expenses thereof. (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 8.4(4))

Reporting, oversight and sanctions 

Reporting standards

Do political parties have to report regularly on their finances? Yes. (1) A political organisation (party) shall prepare annual report regarding each reporting year in accordance with the Law on Accounting and other regulatory enactments. (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 8.‌5(1))
Do political parties have to report on their finances in relation to election campaigns? Yes. (1) The political organisations (parties) which have submitted their lists of candidates for the election to the Saeima, local government councils (parish councils) or the European Parliament, shall submit to the Corruption Prevention and Combating Bureau a declaration of income and expenses of elections signed by the board of the relevant political organisation (party) or authorised person thereof in accordance with the procedures specified by the Cabinet within a period of 30 days after the election of the Saeima, local government councils (parish councils) or the European Parliament. ( Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 8.2(1))
Is information in reports from political parties and/​or candidates to be made public? Yes. (3) Within 15 days after the receipt of a gift (donation) the political organisation (party) shall inform the Corruption Prevention and Combating Bureau thereof. The Corruption Prevention and Combating Bureau shall publish information on its Internet homepage regarding gifts (donations) received by a political organisation (party). The information to be indicated in the report of a political organisation (party) and the procedures for the submission thereof, as well as the procedures by which information shall be published regarding the gifts (donations) received by a political organisation (party) and the content of this information shall be determined by the Cabinet. Also: (1) The financial and economic activities of political organisations (parties) shall be transparent and publicly available. (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 4(3) & 9(1) )
Must reports from political parties and/​or candidates reveal the identity of donors? Yes. (1) Financing of political organisations (parties) in the form of anonymous gifts (donations) is prohibited. (2) Within the meaning of this Law a gift (donation) is anonymous if in the accounting documents of the political organisation (party) the given name, surname, personal identification number and place of residence in respect of the giver (donor) – a natural person – are not indicated. (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 7(1) & (2))
Institutions receiving financial reports from political parties and/​or candidates
Institutions receiving financial reports from political parties and/​or candidates: Electoral Management Board No. Absent from legal framework
Institutions receiving financial reports from political parties and/​or candidates: Auditing agency No. Absent from legal framework
Institutions receiving financial reports from political parties and/​or candidates: Ministry No. Absent from legal framework
Institutions receiving financial reports from political parties and/​or candidates: Special institution Yes. (1) The political organisations (parties) which have submitted their lists of candidates for the election to the Saeima, local government councils (parish councils) or the European Parliament, shall submit to the Corruption Prevention and Combating Bureau a declaration (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 8.2(1))
Institutions receiving financial reports from political parties and/​or candidates: Court No. Absent from legal framework
Institutions receiving financial reports from political parties and/​or candidates: Other No. Absent from legal framework

Political finance oversight

Is it specified that a particular institution(s) is responsible for examining financial reports and/​or investigating violations?
Institution responsible for examining financial reports and/or investigating violations: Court No. Absent from legal framework
Institution responsible for examining financial reports and/or investigating violations: Ministry No. Absent from legal framework
Institution responsible for examining financial reports and/or investigating violations: Auditing agency No. Absent from legal framework
Institution responsible for examining financial reports and/or investigating violations: Electoral Management Body No. Absent from legal framework
Institution responsible for examining financial reports and/or investigating violations: Institution for this purpose No. Absent from legal framework
Institution responsible for examining financial reports and/or investigating violations: Other Yes. (3) The Corruption Prevention and Combating Bureau shall perform an audit of declarations of income and expenses of elections and shall, within six months from the closing date of the period for submitting the declarations, inform at once the public regarding all breaches of the provisions for the financing of political organisations (parties) identified in all those declarations submitted, as well as regarding the measures carried out for the prevention thereof. (10) If the Corruption Prevention and Combating Bureau identifies a violation of the provisions of Section 2, Paragraph three, Section 4, Paragraph one and Section 6, Paragraph one, the Head of the Corruption Prevention and Combating Bureau has a duty to (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 8.2(3) & 10(1.1))
Other institutions with a formal role in political finance oversight
Institutions with a formal role in political finance oversight: Court No. Absent from legal framework
Institutions with a formal role in political finance oversight: Ministry No. Absent from legal framework
Institutions with a formal role in political finance oversight: Auditing agency No. Absent from legal framework
Institutions with a formal role in political finance oversight: EMB No. Absent from legal framework
Institutions with a formal role in political finance oversight: Institution for this purpose No. Absent from legal framework
Institutions with a formal role in political finance oversight: Other No. Absent from legal framework
Sanctions for political finance infractions
Sanctions for political finance infractions: Fines Yes. For the illegal financing of political organisations (parties) or associations of political organisations (associations) on a large scale, the applicable punishment is deprivation of liberty for a term not exceeding two years or temporary deprivation of liberty, or community service, or a fine. (Criminal Law, 1998, amended 2013. Section 288.2 (1))
Sanctions for political finance infractions: Loss of public funding Yes. (4) The Corruption Prevention and Combating Bureau shall take a decision regarding the suspension of the disbursement of State budget financing, if: 1) the operations of a political organisation (party) are suspended – for the period of the suspension of the operations of the political organisation (party); 2) the political organisation (party) has not submitted its annual report or declaration of income and expenses of elections for the previous year – for the next calendar year; or 3) violation of the provisions of Section 7.4 of this Law is determined and the decision regarding the application of a punishment has come into effect – for one year. (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 7.3(4))
Sanctions for political finance infractions: Penal/Criminal Yes. (1) For the illegal financing of political organisations (parties) or associations of political organisations (associations) on a large scale, the applicable punishment is deprivation of liberty for a term not exceeding two years or temporary deprivation of liberty, or community service, or a fine. (2) For the activities provided for in Paragraph one of this Section, if they have been committed by a group of persons pursuant to prior agreement, the applicable punishment is deprivation of liberty for a term not exceeding four years or temporary deprivation of liberty, or community service, or a fine. (Criminal Law, 1998, amended 2013. Section 288.‌2)
Sanctions for political finance infractions: Forfeiture Yes. (1.1) If the Corruption Prevention and Combating Bureau identifies a violation of the first paragraph of Section 4, the Head of the Corruption Prevention and Combating Bureau has a duty to charge the relevant political organisation (party) to repay the illegally acquired financial assets to the payer within 30 days, but to return the property to the giver thereof. If the political organisation (party) fails to repay the illegally acquired financial assets to the payer or to return the property to the giver thereof within 30 days after the time of the notification of the relevant decision, the Head of the Bureau for the Prevention and Combating of Corruption has the duty to charge the relevant political organisation (party) to include the illegally acquired financial assets into the State budget within 30 days, and to transfer the property to the State property. Upon a motivated request from the relevant political organisation (party) the Head of the Corruption Prevention and Combating Bureau may divide the repayment of the financial assets into periods or extend the period of repayment of financial assets, but not longer than for 90 days. (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 10 (1.1))
Sanctions for political finance infractions: Deregistration of party Yes. (6) If the political organisation (party) fails to comply with the court judgment on suspension of activity or fails to prevent the breach of law in the period appointed by the court, the Head of the Corruption Prevention and Combating Bureau has the duty to initiate termination of the activity of the relevant political organisation (party) through court. (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 10 (6))
Sanctions for political finance infractions: Loss of elected office No. Absent from legal framework
Sanctions for political finance infractions: Suspension of political party Yes. (5) If a political organisation (party) fails to fulfil the obligation determined in Paragraphs 1.1, two, 2.1 and three of this Section within the term period determined by the Corruption Prevention and Combating Bureau or within a month after forwarding of a warning fails to submit the declaration of income and expenses of elections referred to in this Law or the annual report, the Head of the Corruption Prevention and Combating Bureau has a duty to initiate suspension of the activity of the relevant political organisation (party) through court within a month. (Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2014, Section 10 (5))
Sanctions for political finance infractions: Loss of nomination of candidate No. Absent from legal framework
Sanctions for political finance infractions: Loss of political rights No. Absent from legal framework
Sanctions for political finance infractions: Other No. Absent from legal framework

Legislation

Law on Financing of Political Organisations (Parties), 1995, amended 2011 (English)pdf
Law on Pre-​election Campaign, 2013, amended 2014 (Latvian)pdf
Criminal Law, 1998, amended 201 (English)pdf
Law On Prevention of Squandering of the Financial Resources and Property of the State and Local Governments, 1995, amended 2001 (English)pdf

*Last update: 2017


Financial Disclosure

The Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest (2002, last amended 2016) sets down the same disclosure requirements for all Latvian public officials, namely Head of State, Ministers, Members of Parliament, and Civil Servants. These include declaring real estate, movable assets, cash, debt, and gifts that exceed the value of the minimum wage. Additionally, income from outside employment, all other positions held, firm ownership, and shares in public or private companies must be disclosed. Ministers and MPs are additionally required to disclose participation in government contracts. Only the Head of State and Civil Servants are required to disclose any positions that would constitute a conflict of interests for two years after ending tenure.

The law requires all public officials to make declarations upon taking and leaving office, and to update them annually. The Administrative Violations Code (1985, amended 2016) and the Criminal Law (1998, amended 2016) specify sanctions for late filling, non-filling, and making false disclosure. These include fines and imprisonment. The State Revenue Service functions as depository body for all public officials. Additionally, the Prevention and Combating of Corruption Bureau is tasked with verifying the accuracy of declarations and enforcing financial disclosure legislation. All public officials’ declarations are made publicly available electronically. However, only those parts of declarations which do not harm the protection of personal data are published. 


Quantitative Data

Primary Metric

20122015201620172020Trend
Disclosure items6371718989
Filing frequency7575757575
Sanctions100100100100100
Monitoring and Oversight758181100100
Public access to declarations5075757575

Alternative Metric

20122015201620172020Trend
Head of State7282828888
Ministers7378788888
Members of Parliament7378788888
Civil servants7385858888

Values lie in range between 0 and 100, higher values implying higher legislation comprehensiveness


Qualitative Data

We are frequently reviewing and refining our data, so in case you notice any mistake in our assessment, feel free to send us an email by clicking the button ()

Head of State

Disclosure items

Spouses and children included in disclosure Yes. Name of the spouse is included in the declaration; property of dependents is included (Article 24 (1.1) (1.4) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Income and Assets
Real estate Yes. Real estate must be disclosed. (Article 24 (1.4) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Movable assets Yes. Movable assets must be disclosed. (Article 24 (1.6) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Cash Yes. The President is required to disclose cash savings if it exceeds twenty months’ wages. (Article 24 (1.7) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Loans and Debts Yes. The President is required to disclose loans and debts if the amount exceeds 20 minimum monthly wages. (Article 24 (1.10) (1.11) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Income from outside employment/assets Yes. The President is required to disclose all income earned in the period covered by the asset declaration. (Article 24 (1.8) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Incompatibilities
Gifts received as a public official No. Absent from legal framework.
Private firm ownership and/or stock holdings Yes. The Head of State is required to disclose private firm ownership and sources of unearned income, such as capital shares, stock and securities. The President may not be among the shareholders of companies that receive orders for public procurement. (Article 24 (1.5) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Ownership of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) Yes. The Head of State is required to disclose private firm ownership and sources of unearned income, such as capital shares, stock and securities. The President may not be among the shareholders of companies that receive orders for public procurement. (Article 24 (1.5) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Holding government contracts No. Absent from legal framework.
Board member, advisor, or company officer of private firm Yes. The Head of state is required to disclose all other positions held. The president may not be a partner in a company that receives orders for public produrement (Article 10 (1) and Article 24 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Post-employment Yes. The Head of state is required to disclose all other positions held that would violate public/public incompatibilities within 2 years of leaving office. (Articles 24 (1.3) and 25 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Simultaneously holding policy-making position and policy-executing position Yes. The Head of state is required to disclose all other positions held. (Article 24 (1.3) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Participating in official decision-making processes that affect private interests Yes. A public official is prohibited, in the performance of the duties of the public official, to prepare or issue administrative acts, perform the supervision, control, inquiry or punitive functions, enter into contracts or perform other activities in which such public officials, their relatives or counterparties are personally or financially interested. (Article 11 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Concurrent employment of family members in public sector No. Absent from legal framework. (General)

Filing frequency

Filing required upon taking office Yes. A person, upon assuming office, shall submit the declaration referred to in Section 23, Paragraph one, Clause 1 of this Law within one month from the day when a decision was taken regarding his or her the appointment, election or approval in the office of the public official or from the day the term of office of members of the Saeima or the councillors of local government city councils (parish or district councils) has begun in accordance with law. (Article 25 (1) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Filing required upon leaving office Yes. If a person has held the office of a public official for more than three months, he or she, upon ending the duties of office of the public official, shall submit the declaration referred to in Section 23, Paragraph one, Clause 3 of this Law within a time period of one month after the last day of the performance of the duties of the office. (Article 25 (3) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Filing required annually Yes. A public official shall submit each year by 1 April the declaration referred to in Section 23, Paragraph one, Clause 2 of this Law. (Article 25 (2) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Ad hoc filing required upon change in assets or conflicts of interest No. Absent from legal framework. (General)

Sanctions

Sanctions stipulated for late filing (fines, administrative, and/or criminal) Yes. Public officials are subject to fines and administrative sanctions (dismissal, forfeiture of right to hold office) for late filing of declarations. Public officials are also subject to penal sanctions for violations of disclosure requirements. ( Section 164 of the Law on Administrative Liability (adopted in 2018, amended 2020) Article 298 of Criminal Law (adopted in 1998, amended in 2020))
Sanctions stipulated for non-filing (fines, administrative, and/or criminal) Yes. The false data in the statutory income, property, business or other property nature in the declaration if the false statements listed on the property or other income on a large scale, shall be punished by temporary imprisonment or community service, or a fine. (3) The statutory declarable assets or other income the source failure or for giving false information about the declared property or other income source, if the following information as provided by law requested by an authorized state body and if false information indicated on the property or other income a largescale, shall be punished by imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years, or a short­term imprisonment or community service, or a fine, confiscation of property or without confiscation of property. (Section 164 of the Law on Administrative Liability (adopted in 2018, amended 2020) Article 219 Criminal Law (adopted in 1998, amended in 2020))
Sanctions stipulated for false disclosure (fines, administrative, and/or criminal) Yes. The false data in the statutory income, property, business or other property nature in the declaration if the false statements listed on the property or other income on a large scale, shall be punished by temporary imprisonment or community service, or a fine. (3) The statutory declarable assets or other income the source failure or for giving false information about the declared property or other income source, if the following information as provided by law requested by an authorized state body and if false information indicated on the property or other income a largescale, shall be punished by imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years, or a short­term imprisonment or community service, or a fine, confiscation of property or without confiscation of property. According to Article 299 of The Criminal Law, public officials are subject to deprivation of liberty for a term not exceeding one year, or a fine not exceeding fifty times the minimum monthly wage, for knowingly submitting a false report. A public official has a duty to compensate for the caused losses (Article 30 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020) Section 164 of the Law on Administrative Liability (adopted in 2018, amended 2020)Articles 219 and 299 Criminal Law (adopted in 1998, amended in 2020))

Monitoring and Oversight

Depository body explicitly identified Yes. State Revenue Service (Article 28 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Enforcement body explicitly identified Yes. The State Revenue Service, Constitution Protection Bureau, the Prime Minister or his or her authorised person (Article 28 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Some agency assigned responsibility for verifying submission Yes. The State Revenue Service, Constitution Protection Bureau, the Prime Minister or his or her authorised person verify submissions. (Article 28 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Some agency assigned responsibility for verifying accuracy Yes. According to Sections 27 and 28 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials, the Prevention and Combating of Corruption Bureau, the Constitution Protection Bureau and the Prime Minister are assigned the legal responsibility to verify if the declarations contain any violations of the Law. However, the Law is not clear regarding which body is assigned the authority for content verification, as it assigns it to a general "competent autorithy" in case a wrongdoing is assessed. (Article 28 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))

Public access to declarations

Public availability Yes. In order to ensure the protection of personal data, the declarations shall contain a part that is publicly accessible and a part that is not publicly accessible. (Article 26 (1) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Timing of information release specified Yes. (6) The data to be published indicated in the declarations of the President, members of the Saeima, Prime Minister, Deputy Prime Ministers, Ministers, Ministers for Special Assignments, Parliamentary Secretaries and councillors of city councils shall be published electronically not later than within one month, but the data to be published indicated in the declarations of other public officials not later than within three months after the submission thereof to the State Revenue Service. (Article 26 (6) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Location(s) of access specified Yes. Declaration will be published electronically. (Article 26 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Cost of access specified No. Absent from legal framework. (General)

Ministers

Disclosure items

Spouses and children included in disclosure Yes. Name of the spouse is included in the declaration; property of dependents is included (Article 24 (1.1) (1.4) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Income and Assets
Real estate Yes. Real estate must be disclosed. (Article 24 (1.4) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Movable assets Yes. Movable assets must be disclosed. (Article 24 (1.6) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Cash Yes. The President is required to disclose cash savings if it exceeds twenty months’ wages. (Article 24 (1.7) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Loans and Debts Yes. The President is required to disclose loans and debts if the amount exceeds 20 minimum monthly wages. (Article 24 (1.10) (1.11) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Income from outside employment/assets Yes. The President is required to disclose all income earned in the period covered by the asset declaration. (Article 24 (1.8) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Incompatibilities
Gifts received as a public official No. Absent from legal framework.
Private firm ownership and/or stock holdings Yes. The ministers are required to disclose private firm ownership and sources of unearned income, such as capital shares, stock and securities. The ministers may not be among the shareholders of companies that receive orders for public procurement. (Article 24 (1.5) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Ownership of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) Yes. The ministers are required to disclose private firm ownership and sources of unearned income, such as capital shares, stock and securities. The ministers may not be among the shareholders of companies that receive orders for public procurement. (Article 24 (1.5) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Holding government contracts No. Absent from legal framework.
Board member, advisor, or company officer of private firm Yes. The ministers are required to disclose all other positions held. A minister may not be a partner in a company that receives orders for public produrement (Article 10 (1) and Article 24 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Post-employment Yes. The ministers are required to disclose all other positions held that would violate public/public incompatibilities within 2 years of leaving office. (Articles 24 (1.3) and 25 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Simultaneously holding policy-making position and policy-executing position Yes. The Head of state is required to disclose all other positions held. (Article 24 (1.3) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Participating in official decision-making processes that affect private interests Yes. A public official is prohibited, in the performance of the duties of the public official, to prepare or issue administrative acts, perform the supervision, control, inquiry or punitive functions, enter into contracts or perform other activities in which such public officials, their relatives or counterparties are personally or financially interested. (Article 11 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Concurrent employment of family members in public sector No. Absent from legal framework. (General)

Filing frequency

Filing required upon taking office Yes. A person, upon assuming office, shall submit the declaration referred to in Section 23, Paragraph one, Clause 1 of this Law within one month from the day when a decision was taken regarding his or her the appointment, election or approval in the office of the public official or from the day the term of office of members of the Saeima or the councillors of local government city councils (parish or district councils) has begun in accordance with law. (Article 25 (1) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Filing required upon leaving office Yes. If a person has held the office of a public official for more than three months, he or she, upon ending the duties of office of the public official, shall submit the declaration referred to in Section 23, Paragraph one, Clause 3 of this Law within a time period of one month after the last day of the performance of the duties of the office. (Article 25 (3) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Filing required annually Yes. A public official shall submit each year by 1 April the declaration referred to in Section 23, Paragraph one, Clause 2 of this Law. (Article 25 (2) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Ad hoc filing required upon change in assets or conflicts of interest No. Absent from legal framework. (General)

Sanctions

Sanctions stipulated for late filing (fines, administrative, and/or criminal) Yes. Public officials are subject to fines and administrative sanctions (dismissal, forfeiture of right to hold office) for late filing of declarations. Public officials are also subject to penal sanctions for violations of disclosure requirements. ( Section 164 of the Law on Administrative Liability (adopted in 2018, amended 2020) Article 298 of Criminal Law (adopted in 1998, amended in 2020))
Sanctions stipulated for non-filing (fines, administrative, and/or criminal) Yes. The false data in the statutory income, property, business or other property nature in the declaration if the false statements listed on the property or other income on a large scale, shall be punished by temporary imprisonment or community service, or a fine. (3) The statutory declarable assets or other income the source failure or for giving false information about the declared property or other income source, if the following information as provided by law requested by an authorized state body and if false information indicated on the property or other income a largescale, shall be punished by imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years, or a short­term imprisonment or community service, or a fine, confiscation of property or without confiscation of property. (Section 164 of the Law on Administrative Liability (adopted in 2018, amended 2020) Article 219 Criminal Law (adopted in 1998, amended in 2020))
Sanctions stipulated for false disclosure (fines, administrative, and/or criminal) Yes. The false data in the statutory income, property, business or other property nature in the declaration if the false statements listed on the property or other income on a large scale, shall be punished by temporary imprisonment or community service, or a fine. (3) The statutory declarable assets or other income the source failure or for giving false information about the declared property or other income source, if the following information as provided by law requested by an authorized state body and if false information indicated on the property or other income a largescale, shall be punished by imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years, or a short­term imprisonment or community service, or a fine, confiscation of property or without confiscation of property. According to Article 299 of The Criminal Law, public officials are subject to deprivation of liberty for a term not exceeding one year, or a fine not exceeding fifty times the minimum monthly wage, for knowingly submitting a false report. A public official has a duty to compensate for the caused losses (Article 30 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020) Section 164 of the Law on Administrative Liability (adopted in 2018, amended 2020)Articles 219 and 299 Criminal Law (adopted in 1998, amended in 2020))

Monitoring and Oversight

Depository body explicitly identified Yes. State Revenue Service (Article 28 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Enforcement body explicitly identified Yes. The State Revenue Service, Constitution Protection Bureau, the Prime Minister or his or her authorised person (Article 28 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Some agency assigned responsibility for verifying submission Yes. The State Revenue Service, Constitution Protection Bureau, the Prime Minister or his or her authorised person verify submissions. (Article 28 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Some agency assigned responsibility for verifying accuracy Yes. According to Sections 27 and 28 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials, the Prevention and Combating of Corruption Bureau, the Constitution Protection Bureau and the Prime Minister are assigned the legal responsibility to verify if the declarations contain any violations of the Law. However, the Law is not clear regarding which body is assigned the authority for content verification, as it assigns it to a general "competent autorithy" in case a wrongdoing is assessed. (Article 28 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))

Public access to declarations

Public availability Yes. In order to ensure the protection of personal data, the declarations shall contain a part that is publicly accessible and a part that is not publicly accessible. (Article 26 (1) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Timing of information release specified Yes. (6) The data to be published indicated in the declarations of the President, members of the Saeima, Prime Minister, Deputy Prime Ministers, Ministers, Ministers for Special Assignments, Parliamentary Secretaries and councillors of city councils shall be published electronically not later than within one month, but the data to be published indicated in the declarations of other public officials not later than within three months after the submission thereof to the State Revenue Service. (Article 26 (6) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Location(s) of access specified Yes. Declaration will be published electronically. (Article 26 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Cost of access specified No. Absent from legal framework. (General)

Members of Parliament

Disclosure items

Spouses and children included in disclosure Yes. Name of the spouse is included in the declaration; property of dependents is included (Article 24 (1.1) (1.4) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Income and Assets
Real estate Yes. Real estate must be disclosed. (Article 24 (1.4) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Movable assets Yes. Movable assets must be disclosed. (Article 24 (1.6) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Cash Yes. The MEPs are required to disclose cash savings if it exceeds twenty months’ wages. (Article 24 (1.7) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Loans and Debts Yes. The MEPs are required to disclose loans and debts if the amount exceeds 20 minimum monthly wages. (Article 24 (1.10) (1.11) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Income from outside employment/assets Yes. The MEPs are required to disclose all income earned in the period covered by the asset declaration. (Article 24 (1.8) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Incompatibilities
Gifts received as a public official No. Absent from legal framework.
Private firm ownership and/or stock holdings Yes. The MEPs are required to disclose private firm ownership and sources of unearned income, such as capital shares, stock and securities. The MEPs may not be among the shareholders of companies that receive orders for public procurement. (Article 24 (1.5) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Ownership of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) Yes. The MEPs are required to disclose private firm ownership and sources of unearned income, such as capital shares, stock and securities. The MEPs may not be among the shareholders of companies that receive orders for public procurement. (Article 24 (1.5) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Holding government contracts No. Absent from legal framework.
Board member, advisor, or company officer of private firm Yes. The MEPs are required to disclose all other positions held. The president may not be a partner in a company that receives orders for public produrement (Article 10 (1) and Article 24 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Post-employment Yes. The MEPs are required to disclose all other positions held that would violate public/public incompatibilities within 2 years of leaving office. (Articles 24 (1.3) and 25 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Simultaneously holding policy-making position and policy-executing position Yes. The Head of state is required to disclose all other positions held. (Article 24 (1.3) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Participating in official decision-making processes that affect private interests Yes. A public official is prohibited, in the performance of the duties of the public official, to prepare or issue administrative acts, perform the supervision, control, inquiry or punitive functions, enter into contracts or perform other activities in which such public officials, their relatives or counterparties are personally or financially interested. (Article 11 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Concurrent employment of family members in public sector No. Absent from legal framework. (General)

Filing frequency

Filing required upon taking office Yes. A person, upon assuming office, shall submit the declaration referred to in Section 23, Paragraph one, Clause 1 of this Law within one month from the day when a decision was taken regarding his or her the appointment, election or approval in the office of the public official or from the day the term of office of members of the Saeima or the councillors of local government city councils (parish or district councils) has begun in accordance with law. (Article 25 (1) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Filing required upon leaving office Yes. If a person has held the office of a public official for more than three months, he or she, upon ending the duties of office of the public official, shall submit the declaration referred to in Section 23, Paragraph one, Clause 3 of this Law within a time period of one month after the last day of the performance of the duties of the office. (Article 25 (3) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Filing required annually Yes. A public official shall submit each year by 1 April the declaration referred to in Section 23, Paragraph one, Clause 2 of this Law. (Article 25 (2) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Ad hoc filing required upon change in assets or conflicts of interest No. Absent from legal framework. (General)

Sanctions

Sanctions stipulated for late filing (fines, administrative, and/or criminal) Yes. Public officials are subject to fines and administrative sanctions (dismissal, forfeiture of right to hold office) for late filing of declarations. Public officials are also subject to penal sanctions for violations of disclosure requirements. ( Section 164 of the Law on Administrative Liability (adopted in 2018, amended 2020) Article 298 of Criminal Law (adopted in 1998, amended in 2020))
Sanctions stipulated for non-filing (fines, administrative, and/or criminal) Yes. The false data in the statutory income, property, business or other property nature in the declaration if the false statements listed on the property or other income on a large scale, shall be punished by temporary imprisonment or community service, or a fine. (3) The statutory declarable assets or other income the source failure or for giving false information about the declared property or other income source, if the following information as provided by law requested by an authorized state body and if false information indicated on the property or other income a largescale, shall be punished by imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years, or a short­term imprisonment or community service, or a fine, confiscation of property or without confiscation of property. (Section 164 of the Law on Administrative Liability (adopted in 2018, amended 2020) Article 219 Criminal Law (adopted in 1998, amended in 2020))
Sanctions stipulated for false disclosure (fines, administrative, and/or criminal) Yes. The false data in the statutory income, property, business or other property nature in the declaration if the false statements listed on the property or other income on a large scale, shall be punished by temporary imprisonment or community service, or a fine. (3) The statutory declarable assets or other income the source failure or for giving false information about the declared property or other income source, if the following information as provided by law requested by an authorized state body and if false information indicated on the property or other income a largescale, shall be punished by imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years, or a short­term imprisonment or community service, or a fine, confiscation of property or without confiscation of property. According to Article 299 of The Criminal Law, public officials are subject to deprivation of liberty for a term not exceeding one year, or a fine not exceeding fifty times the minimum monthly wage, for knowingly submitting a false report. A public official has a duty to compensate for the caused losses (Article 30 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020) Section 164 of the Law on Administrative Liability (adopted in 2018, amended 2020)Articles 219 and 299 Criminal Law (adopted in 1998, amended in 2020))

Monitoring and Oversight

Depository body explicitly identified Yes. State Revenue Service (Article 28 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Enforcement body explicitly identified Yes. The State Revenue Service, Constitution Protection Bureau, the Prime Minister or his or her authorised person (Article 28 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Some agency assigned responsibility for verifying submission Yes. The State Revenue Service, Constitution Protection Bureau, the Prime Minister or his or her authorised person verify submissions. (Article 28 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Some agency assigned responsibility for verifying accuracy Yes. According to Sections 27 and 28 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials, the Prevention and Combating of Corruption Bureau, the Constitution Protection Bureau and the Prime Minister are assigned the legal responsibility to verify if the declarations contain any violations of the Law. However, the Law is not clear regarding which body is assigned the authority for content verification, as it assigns it to a general "competent autorithy" in case a wrongdoing is assessed.. (Article 28 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))

Public access to declarations

Public availability Yes. In order to ensure the protection of personal data, the declarations shall contain a part that is publicly accessible and a part that is not publicly accessible. (Article 26 (1) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Timing of information release specified Yes. (6) The data to be published indicated in the declarations of the President, members of the Saeima, Prime Minister, Deputy Prime Ministers, Ministers, Ministers for Special Assignments, Parliamentary Secretaries and councillors of city councils shall be published electronically not later than within one month, but the data to be published indicated in the declarations of other public officials not later than within three months after the submission thereof to the State Revenue Service. (Article 26 (6) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Location(s) of access specified Yes. Declaration will be published electronically. (Article 26 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Cost of access specified No. Absent from legal framework. (General)

Civil servants

Disclosure items

Spouses and children included in disclosure Yes. Name of the spouse is included in the declaration; property of dependents is included (Article 24 (1.1) (1.4) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Income and Assets
Real estate Yes. Real estate must be disclosed. (Article 24 (1.4) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Movable assets Yes. Movable assets must be disclosed. (Article 24 (1.6) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Cash Yes. The civil servants are required to disclose cash savings if it exceeds twenty months’ wages. (Article 24 (1.7) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Loans and Debts Yes. The civil servants are required to disclose loans and debts if the amount exceeds 20 minimum monthly wages. (Article 24 (1.10) (1.11) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Income from outside employment/assets Yes. The civil servants are required to disclose all income earned in the period covered by the asset declaration. (Article 24 (1.8) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Incompatibilities
Gifts received as a public official No. Absent from legal framework.
Private firm ownership and/or stock holdings Yes. The civil servants are required to disclose private firm ownership and sources of unearned income, such as capital shares, stock and securities. A civil servant may not be among the shareholders of companies that receive orders for public procurement. (Article 24 (1.5) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Ownership of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) Yes. The civil servants are required to disclose private firm ownership and sources of unearned income, such as capital shares, stock and securities. A civil servant may not be among the shareholders of companies that receive orders for public procurement. (Article 24 (1.5) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Holding government contracts No. Absent from legal framework.
Board member, advisor, or company officer of private firm Yes. The civil servants are required to disclose all other positions held. The president may not be a partner in a company that receives orders for public produrement (Article 10 (1) and Article 24 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Post-employment Yes. The civil servants are required to disclose all other positions held that would violate public/public incompatibilities within 2 years of leaving office. (Articles 24 (1.3) and 25 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Simultaneously holding policy-making position and policy-executing position Yes. The civil servants are required to disclose all other positions held. (Article 24 (1.3) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Participating in official decision-making processes that affect private interests Yes. A public official is prohibited, in the performance of the duties of the public official, to prepare or issue administrative acts, perform the supervision, control, inquiry or punitive functions, enter into contracts or perform other activities in which such public officials, their relatives or counterparties are personally or financially interested. (Article 11 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Concurrent employment of family members in public sector No. Absent from legal framework. (General)

Filing frequency

Filing required upon taking office Yes. A person, upon assuming office, shall submit the declaration referred to in Section 23, Paragraph one, Clause 1 of this Law within one month from the day when a decision was taken regarding his or her the appointment, election or approval in the office of the public official or from the day the term of office of members of the Saeima or the councillors of local government city councils (parish or district councils) has begun in accordance with law. (Article 25 (1) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Filing required upon leaving office Yes. If a person has held the office of a public official for more than three months, he or she, upon ending the duties of office of the public official, shall submit the declaration referred to in Section 23, Paragraph one, Clause 3 of this Law within a time period of one month after the last day of the performance of the duties of the office. (Article 25 (3) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Filing required annually Yes. A public official shall submit each year by 1 April the declaration referred to in Section 23, Paragraph one, Clause 2 of this Law. (Article 25 (2) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Ad hoc filing required upon change in assets or conflicts of interest No. Absent from legal framework. (General)

Sanctions

Sanctions stipulated for late filing (fines, administrative, and/or criminal) Yes. Public officials are subject to fines and administrative sanctions (dismissal, forfeiture of right to hold office) for late filing of declarations. Public officials are also subject to penal sanctions for violations of disclosure requirements. ( Section 164 of the Law on Administrative Liability (adopted in 2018, amended 2020) Article 298 of Criminal Law (adopted in 1998, amended in 2020))
Sanctions stipulated for non-filing (fines, administrative, and/or criminal) Yes. The false data in the statutory income, property, business or other property nature in the declaration if the false statements listed on the property or other income on a large scale, shall be punished by temporary imprisonment or community service, or a fine. (3) The statutory declarable assets or other income the source failure or for giving false information about the declared property or other income source, if the following information as provided by law requested by an authorized state body and if false information indicated on the property or other income a largescale, shall be punished by imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years, or a short­term imprisonment or community service, or a fine, confiscation of property or without confiscation of property. (Section 164 of the Law on Administrative Liability (adopted in 2018, amended 2020) Article 219 Criminal Law (adopted in 1998, amended in 2020))
Sanctions stipulated for false disclosure (fines, administrative, and/or criminal) Yes. The false data in the statutory income, property, business or other property nature in the declaration if the false statements listed on the property or other income on a large scale, shall be punished by temporary imprisonment or community service, or a fine. (3) The statutory declarable assets or other income the source failure or for giving false information about the declared property or other income source, if the following information as provided by law requested by an authorized state body and if false information indicated on the property or other income a largescale, shall be punished by imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years, or a short­term imprisonment or community service, or a fine, confiscation of property or without confiscation of property. According to Article 299 of The Criminal Law, public officials are subject to deprivation of liberty for a term not exceeding one year, or a fine not exceeding fifty times the minimum monthly wage, for knowingly submitting a false report. A public official has a duty to compensate for the caused losses (Article 30 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020) Section 164 of the Law on Administrative Liability (adopted in 2018, amended 2020)Articles 219 and 299 Criminal Law (adopted in 1998, amended in 2020))

Monitoring and Oversight

Depository body explicitly identified Yes. State Revenue Service (Article 28 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Enforcement body explicitly identified Yes. The State Revenue Service, Constitution Protection Bureau, the Prime Minister or his or her authorised person (Article 28 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Some agency assigned responsibility for verifying submission Yes. The State Revenue Service, Constitution Protection Bureau, the Prime Minister or his or her authorised person verify submissions. (Article 28 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Some agency assigned responsibility for verifying accuracy Yes. According to Sections 27 and 28 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials, the Prevention and Combating of Corruption Bureau, the Constitution Protection Bureau and the Prime Minister are assigned the legal responsibility to verify if the declarations contain any violations of the Law. However, the Law is not clear regarding which body is assigned the authority for content verification, as it assigns it to a general "competent autorithy" in case a wrongdoing is assessed. (Article 28 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))

Public access to declarations

Public availability Yes. In order to ensure the protection of personal data, the declarations shall contain a part that is publicly accessible and a part that is not publicly accessible. (Article 26 (1) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Timing of information release specified Yes. The data to be published indicated in the declarations of the President, members of the Saeima, Prime Minister, Deputy Prime Ministers, Ministers, Ministers for Special Assignments, Parliamentary Secretaries and councillors of city councils shall be published electronically not later than within one month, but the data to be published indicated in the declarations of other public officials not later than within three months after the submission thereof to the State Revenue Service. (Article 26 (6) of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Location(s) of access specified Yes. Declaration will be published electronically. (Article 26 of Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (adopted in 2002, amended in 2020))
Cost of access specified No. Absent from legal framework. (General)

Legislation

Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials of 2002_LAT (Latvian)pdf
Administrative Violations Code of 1985_LAT (Latvian)pdf
Law on Administrative Liability of 2020_LAT (Latvian)pdf
Criminal Law of 1998_LAT (Latvian)pdf

*Last update: 2017


Conflict of Interest

The Latvian Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in activities of Public Officials (2002, last amended in 2016) includes a general clause for all public officials to avoid conflicts of interests. Further limitations regarding conflicts of interests are very similar for all public officials. The Head of State, Ministers, and Members of Parliament may not accept gifts, hold shares in private or public companies, or hold government contracts. Meanwhile, Civil Servants are only hindered from accepting gifts or participating in a private company. Furthermore, no public official may become employed or acquire shares of an actor that was previously under their supervision for two years after ending tenure. No laws exist that prevent public officials from participating in a decision which affects private interests.

Should public officials violate regulations on conflicts of interests, they may face fines, removal from office or prison sentences. The Corruption Prevention and Combating Bureau functions as monitoring and enforcement body for Head of State, Ministers, MPs, and Civil Servants.


Quantitative Data

Primary Metric

20122015201620172020Trend
Restrictions8855555588
Sanctions100100100100100
Monitoring and Oversight3810010010038

Alternative Metric

20122015201620172020Trend
Head of State6387878763
Ministers8087878780
Members of Parliament8087878780
Civil servants7780808077

Values lie in range between 0 and 100, higher values implying higher legislation comprehensiveness


Qualitative Data

We are frequently reviewing and refining our data, so in case you notice any mistake in our assessment, feel free to send us an email by clicking the button ()

Head of State

Restrictions

General restriction on conflict of interest No. Absent from legal framework. (General)
Accepting gifts Yes. Legal framework describe gifts that heads of state are restricted from accepting and gifts that civil servants must declare. (Articles 13,13.1, 13.2, 13.3 and 14, Subsection 2 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials (2002) Article 3 of The Cabinet Regulation No.888 “Procedures by Which the Gifts Accepted” (2008) )
Private firm ownership and/or stock holdings Yes. General (Article 9, Subsection 3 and 10, Subsection 1 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials (2002))
Ownership of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) Yes. General (Article 10, Subsection 1 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials (2002))
Holding government contracts Yes. General (Article 10, Subsection 1 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials (2002))
Board member, advisor, or company officer of private firm Yes. General (Article 38 of the Constitution (1922))
Post-employment Yes. The Head of State is restricted from accepting employment that would violate public/public incompatibilities. There are post-employment restrictions for the Head of State. (Article 14 The Law On Ensuring the work of the President (1995) Article 10, Subsections 2 and 7 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest (2002))
Simultaneously holding policy-making position and policy-executing position Yes. General (Article 38 of the Constitution (1922))
Participating in official decision-making processes that affect private interests Yes. The Head of State is restricted from voting on policy decisions related to his/her private interests. (Article 22, Subsection 2 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials (2002))
Assisting family or friends in obtaining employment in public sector Yes. General (Article 11, Subsection 1 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials (2002))

Sanctions

Fines are stipulated for violations of COI regulations restricting behavior Yes. General (Articles 166.28, 166.29, 166.30, 166.31 of The Latvian Administrative Violations Code (1984) )
Administrative sanctions are stipulated for violations of COI regulations restricting behavior Yes. General (Articles 166.28, 166.29, 166.30, 166.31 of The Latvian Administrative Violations Code (1984) )
Penal sanctions are stipulated for violations of COI regulations restricting behavior Yes. General (Articles 325 and 326 of The Criminal Law (1998) )

Monitoring and Oversight

Monitoring body specified (guidance, training, data tracking) No. Absent from legal framework. (General)
Enforcement body specified (sanctions, hearings) No. Absent from legal framework. (General)

Ministers

Restrictions

General restriction on conflict of interest No. Absent from legal framework. (General)
Accepting gifts Yes. Legal framework describe gifts that ministers are restricted from accepting and gifts that civil servants must declare. (Articles 13,13.1, 13.2, 13.3 and 14 Subsection 2 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest (2002) Article 3 of The Cabinet Regulation No.888 “Procedures by Which the Gifts Accepted” (2008))
Private firm ownership and/or stock holdings Yes. General (Article 10, Subsection 1 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials (2002))
Ownership of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) Yes. General (Article 10, Subsection 1 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials (2002))
Holding government contracts Yes. General (Article 32 of the Constitution (1992) Article 10, Subsection 1 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest (2002) )
Board member, advisor, or company officer of private firm Yes. General (Article 7, Subsection 2 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials (2002))
Post-employment Yes. General (Article 10, Subsection 1 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials (2002))
Simultaneously holding policy-making position and policy-executing position Yes. General (Article 7, Subsection 2 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials (2002))
Participating in official decision-making processes that affect private interests Yes. Ministers are restricted from voting on policy decisions related to an official’s private interests. (Article 22, Subsection 2 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials (2002))
Assisting family or friends in obtaining employment in public sector Yes. General (Article 11, Subsection 1 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials (2002))

Sanctions

Fines are stipulated for violations of COI regulations restricting behavior Yes. General (Articles 166.28, 166.29, 166.30, 166.31 of The Latvian Administrative Violations Code (1984) )
Administrative sanctions are stipulated for violations of COI regulations restricting behavior Yes. General (Articles 166.28, 166.29, 166.30, 166.31 of The Latvian Administrative Violations Code (1984) )
Penal sanctions are stipulated for violations of COI regulations restricting behavior Yes. General (Articles 325 and 326 of The Criminal Law (1998) )

Monitoring and Oversight

Monitoring body specified (guidance, training, data tracking) No. Absent from legal framework. (General)
Enforcement body specified (sanctions, hearings) Yes. The head of the institution is assigned the responsibility of enforcing conflict of interest restrictions on Ministers. (Article 20, Subsection 1 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials (2002))

Members of Parliament

Restrictions

General restriction on conflict of interest No. Absent from legal framework. (General)
Accepting gifts Yes. Legal framework describe gifts that MPs are restricted from accepting and gifts that civil servants must declare. (Articles 13,13.1, 13.2, 13.3 and 14, Subsection 2 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest (2002) Article 3 of The Cabinet Regulation No.888 “Procedures by Which the Gifts Accepted...” (2008) )
Private firm ownership and/or stock holdings Yes. General (Article 10, Subsection 1 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials (2002))
Ownership of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) Yes. General (Article 10, Subsection 1 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials (2002))
Holding government contracts Yes. General (Article 32 of the Constitution (1992) Article 10, Subsection 1 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest (2002) )
Board member, advisor, or company officer of private firm Yes. MPs are restricted from membership on boards of private firms. However, the law does not specify who might be a superior official for MPs to report to. (Article 7, Subsection 2 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials (2002))
Post-employment Yes. General (Article 10, Subsection 1 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials (2002))
Simultaneously holding policy-making position and policy-executing position Yes. General (Article 7 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials (2002))
Participating in official decision-making processes that affect private interests Yes. MPs are restricted from voting on policy decisions related to officials' private interests. (Article 22, Subsection 2 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials (2002) Article 9 of the Code of Ethics for Members of the Saeima (2006))
Assisting family or friends in obtaining employment in public sector Yes. General (Article 11, Subsection 1 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials (2002))

Sanctions

Fines are stipulated for violations of COI regulations restricting behavior Yes. General (Articles 166.28, 166.29, 166.30, 166.31 of The Latvian Administrative Violations Code (1984) )
Administrative sanctions are stipulated for violations of COI regulations restricting behavior Yes. General (Articles 166.28, 166.29, 166.30, 166.31 of The Latvian Administrative Violations Code (1984) )
Penal sanctions are stipulated for violations of COI regulations restricting behavior Yes. General (Articles 325 and 326 of The Criminal Law (1998) )

Monitoring and Oversight

Monitoring body specified (guidance, training, data tracking) No. Absent from legal framework. (General)
Enforcement body specified (sanctions, hearings) Yes. Tthe Mandate, Ethics and Submissions Committee is assigned the responsibility of enforcing conflict of interest restrictions on MPs. (Article 179, Subsection 3 of The Rules of Procedure of the Saeima (1994))

Civil servants

Restrictions

General restriction on conflict of interest No. Absent from legal framework. (General)
Accepting gifts Yes. Legal framework describe gifts that civil servants are restricted from accepting and gifts that civil servants must declare. (Articles 13,13.1, 13.2, 13.3 and 14, Subsection 2 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest (2002) Article 3 of The Cabinet Regulation No.888 “Procedures by Which the Gifts Accepted...” (2008) )
Private firm ownership and/or stock holdings Yes. General (Article 10, Subsection 1.1 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials (2002))
Ownership of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) Yes. General (Article 10, Subsection 1 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials (2002))
Holding government contracts Yes. General (Article 10, Subsection 1.1 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials (2002))
Board member, advisor, or company officer of private firm Yes. General (Article 7, Subsection 5, Points 3.1 and 3.2 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest (2002))
Post-employment Yes. Two-year restrictions are established for civil servants regarding employment in certain industries after leaving their position. (Article 10, Subsections 2 and 7 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials (2002))
Simultaneously holding policy-making position and policy-executing position No. Absent from legal framework. (General)
Participating in official decision-making processes that affect private interests Yes. Civil servants are restricted from voting on policy decisions related to the official’s private interests. (Articles 11, Subsection 1 and Article 22, Subsection 2 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest (2002) Articles 12 to 14 of The Cabinet instruction No. 1 “Principles of bheavior for Civil Servants” (2001) )
Assisting family or friends in obtaining employment in public sector Yes. General (Article 11, Subsection 1 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials (2002))

Sanctions

Fines are stipulated for violations of COI regulations restricting behavior Yes. General (Articles 166.28, 166.29, 166.30, 166.31 of The Latvian Administrative Violations Code (1984) )
Administrative sanctions are stipulated for violations of COI regulations restricting behavior Yes. General (Articles 166.28, 166.29, 166.30, 166.31 of The Latvian Administrative Violations Code (1984) )
Penal sanctions are stipulated for violations of COI regulations restricting behavior Yes. General (Articles 325 and 326 of The Criminal Law (1998) )

Monitoring and Oversight

Monitoring body specified (guidance, training, data tracking) No. Absent from legal framework. (General)
Enforcement body specified (sanctions, hearings) Yes. The head of the institution is assigned the responsibility of enforcing conflict of interest restrictions on civil servants. (Article 20, Subsection 1 of The Law On Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials (2002))

Legislation

Constitution of the Republic of Latvia of 1922 (Latvian)pdf
Law on Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Activities of Public Officials of 2002 (Latvian)pdf
Law on Corruption Prevention and Combating Bureau of 2002 (Latvian)pdf

*Last update: 2017


Freedom of Information

Latvia's legal freedom of information framework is primarily governed by its Constitution (1922) and Freedom of Information Law (1998, amended 2015). The purpose of the Law is to ensure that the public has access to information, which is at the disposal of institutions or which an institution has a duty to create. An institution is defined as every institution, as well as persons who implement administrative functions.

Specific exemptions to disclosure are outlined in the aforementioned FOI law, Law on Official Secrets (1996), and Personal Data Protection Law (2000). No public interest test exists whereby exemptions to disclosure may be overridden in cases where disclosure of information benefits the public interest.

Appeals may be filed with public authorities and with the courts. There is no appeals process through an independent non-judicial mechanism, such as an information commissioner.

There are no sanctions specified in the law for violations of FOI provisions, nor are there any enforcement or oversight bodies tasked with managing implementation. 


Quantitative Data

Primary Metric

20122015201620172020Trend
Scope and Coverage9393939393
Information access and release8888888888
Exceptions and Overrides6767676767
Sanctions for non-compliance00000
Monitoring and Oversight00000

Values lie in range between 0 and 100, higher values implying higher legislation comprehensiveness


Qualitative Data

We are frequently reviewing and refining our data, so in case you notice any mistake in our assessment, feel free to send us an email by clicking the button ()

Scope and Coverage

Scope of disclosure

Existence of legal right to access Yes. Everyone has the right to freedom of expression which includes the right to freely receive, keep and distribute information and to express their views. Censorship is prohibited (Article 100, Constitution of Latvia, 1922)
"Information" or "Documents" is defined Yes. 1) information – information or compilations of information, in any technically possible form of fixation, storage or transfer; (Article 1 of the Freedom of Information Law, 1998, amended 2015)
Proactive disclosure is specified Yes. 1. These Regulations prescribe the procedures, by which institutions shall place information on the Internet in order to ensure availability thereof. 2. These Regulations shall apply to institutions of direct administration and to derived public persons, except for local government institutions. (Regulations of the Cabinet of Ministers No. 445 Procedures for Institutions to Post Information on the Internet, 2020)

Coverage of public and private sectors

Executive branch Yes. The purpose of the law is to ensure that the public has access to information which is held by an institution or a body under its jurisdiction are obliged to. This Act provides for a single procedure in which individuals are entitled to obtain information and authority to use it. This Law applies to documented information that the institutions of information circulation. An institution is defined as every institution, as well as persons who implement administration functions and tasks if such person in the circulation of information is associated with the implementation of the relevant functions and tasks. (Articles 1 and 2 of the Freedom of Information Law, 1998, amended 2015)
Legislative branch Yes. The purpose of the law is to ensure that the public has access to information which is held by an institution or a body under its jurisdiction are obliged to. This Act provides for a single procedure in which individuals are entitled to obtain information and authority to use it. This Law applies to documented information that the institutions of information circulation. An institution is defined as every institution, as well as persons who implement administration functions and tasks if such person in the circulation of information is associated with the implementation of the relevant functions and tasks. (Articles 1 and 2 of the Freedom of Information Law, 1998, amended 2015)
Judicial branch Yes. The purpose of the law is to ensure that the public has access to information which is held by an institution or a body under its jurisdiction are obliged to. This Act provides for a single procedure in which individuals are entitled to obtain information and authority to use it. This Law applies to documented information that the institutions of information circulation. An institution is defined as every institution, as well as persons who implement administration functions and tasks if such person in the circulation of information is associated with the implementation of the relevant functions and tasks. (Articles 1 and 2 of the Freedom of Information Law, 1998, amended 2015)
Other public bodies Yes. The purpose of the law is to ensure that the public has access to information which is held by an institution or a body under its jurisdiction are obliged to. This Act provides for a single procedure in which individuals are entitled to obtain information and authority to use it. This Law applies to documented information that the institutions of information circulation. An institution is defined as every institution, as well as persons who implement administration functions and tasks if such person in the circulation of information is associated with the implementation of the relevant functions and tasks. (Articles 1 and 2 of the Freedom of Information Law, 1998, amended 2015)
Private sector No. Absent from legal framework. (General)

Access to specific documents (subject to reactive and/or proactive disclosure)

Draft legal instruments Yes. The government has to inform the society of its actions. The meetings of the Cabinet are open and their agenda, minutes, and drafts of regulatory enactments must be published on the webpage of the Cabinet. The ministries are responsible for informing the society of drafts of legal enactments. The procedure is further governed by the Cabinet's internal instructions. (Article 29 of the Cabinet Structure Law, 2008, amended 2016 Section IV and V of the Regulations of the Cabinet of Ministers No. 445, Procedures for Institutions to Post Information on the Internet (2020))
Enacted legal instruments Yes. Every law and Cabinet Regulation and President act must be published in the official newspaper.Cabinet decisions and Prime Minister's orders must be published in the official newspaper unless otherwise provided therein. (Official Publications and Legal Information Law, 2012, amended 2020)
Annual budgets Yes. The state budget has to be regularly published in a comprehensible and easily understandable form. Every institution has to publish its budget on their reggaes a month after the adoption of the state's annual one. Local governments have to make their budgets available. (Article 14 of the Law on Budget and Financial Management, 1994 (amended 2020))
Annual chart of accounts (actual expenditures) Yes. Institutions prepare public reports regarding their activities and use of budget resources Government institutions prepare annual public reports on aims and results of the activities of the institution and its use of budget funding until 1 July of the year following the financial year and afterwards publish them on their webpages in a month's time. (Article 94 of the State Administration Structure Law, 2002, amended 2017 Article 14 of the Law on Budget and Financial Management, 1994, amended 2020 )
Annual reports of public entities and programs Yes. Institutions prepare public reports regarding their activities and use of budget resources Government institutions prepare annual public reports on aims and results of the activities of the institution and its use of budget funding until 1 July of the year following the financial year and afterwards publish them on their webpages in one month period. (Article 94 of the State Administration Structure Law, 2002, amended 2017 Article 14 of the Law on Budget and Financial Management, 1994, amended 2020 )

Information access and release

Procedural access

Universal access (agencies, citizens and non-citizens) Yes. (1) The purpose of this Law is to ensure that the public has access to information, which is at the disposal of institutions or which an institution in conformity with its competence has a duty to create. This Law determines uniform procedures by which private persons are entitled to obtain information from an institution and to utilise it. (Article 2 of the Freedom of Information Law, 1998, amended 2015)
Type of request is specified (written, electronic, oral) Yes. Information may be requested in writing, orally or electronically. (Article 11 of the Freedom of Information Law, 1998, amended 2015)
Assistance to requesters must be provided by law (includes barriers due to language differences, illiteracy, complexity of requests, etc.) No. Absent from legal framework. (General)
Cost of access is specified (free, request fees, photocopying costs, other administrative costs) Yes. The fee for the provision of information should not exceed the document or information search, additional processing and reproduction costs. Do not include any other costs incurred in dealing with legal and political issues related to reply to the request for information. Every applicant for information may request exemption from the fee for the service. The Cabinet shall determine the cases in which an individual is reduced fees for the provision of information or remitted. The procedures by which pays for the provision of information, as well as paid services and the amount determined by the Cabinet. Fees for requested information are mandated only if additional processing is required (searching, copying, etc.). The paid services for providing information, their prices and persons who are exempted of payments or pay at a reduced rate, are specified in Cabinet Regulations. (Article 13 of the Freedom of Information Law, 1998, amended 2015 Articles 3, 4, 5 and 6 of the Cabinet Regulation No. 940, Regulations regarding Paid Services for the Provision of Information, 2006 (amended 2013))

Deadlines for release of information

20-day response deadline Yes. A person has to receive the information requested in 7 or 10 days time (based on the volume of the requested information) or receive a notice of extension of the period in 15 days' time. (Article 14 of the Freedom of Information Law, 1998, amended 2015)
Agency granted right to extend response time Yes. Response time can be extended for a period that would lead to an overall response time of 30 days. (Article 14 of the Freedom of Information Law, 1998, amended 2015)
Maximum total response time of no more than 40 days Yes. Response time can be extended for a period that would lead to an overall response time of 30 days. (Article 14 of the Freedom of Information Law, 1998, amended 2015)

Exceptions and Overrides

Exemptions to disclosure

Existence of secrecy/states secrets law Yes. Law on Official Secrets, 1996 (Law on Official Secrets, 1996, amended 2020)
Existence of personal privacy/data law Yes. Personal Data Processing Law, 2018 (Personal Data Processing Law, 2018, amended 2019)
Specific exemptions to disclosure Yes. Information exemptions are categorized as information of restricted access and generally accessible information. Restricted access information is exempt from coverage. Information regarding private secrets and private life are also exempt of generally accessible information. State secrets are also exempt from generally accessible information. (Articles 5-8 of the Freedom of Information Law, 1998, amended 2015 Articles 9 and 12 of the Law on Official Secrets, 1996, amended 2020)
Public Interest test: Specified exemptions to disclosure may be overridden in cases where disclosure of information benefits the public interest. No. Absent from legal framework. (General)

Appeals

Appeals allowed within public entities Yes. There is a right of internal appeal to the head of the institution. (Article 15 of the Freedom of Information Law, 1998, amended 2015 Administrative Procedure Law, 2001, amended 2017)
Independent, non-judicial appeals mechanism, e.g., information commissioner. Does not include Ombudsman unless appeals decisions are binding. No. Absent from legal framework. (General)
Judicial appeals mechanism Yes. Administrative District Court decisios can be appealed in cassation to the Supreme Court Senate's Department of Administrative Cases. (Article 15 of the Freedom of Information Law, 1998, amended 2015 Administrative Procedure Law, 2001, amended 2017)

Sanctions for non-compliance

Administrative sanctions are specified for violations of disclosure requirements No. Absent from legal framework. (General)
Fines are specified for violations of disclosure requirements No. Absent from legal framework. (General)
Criminal sanctions are specified for violations of disclosure requirements No. Absent from legal framework. (General)

Monitoring and Oversight

Information officers must be appointed in public agencies No. Absent from legal framework. (General)
Public body that is responsible for applying sanctions No. Absent from legal framework. (General)
Public body that is responsible for public outreach (raising public awareness) No. Absent from legal framework. (General)
Nodal agency for RTI (implementation support/compliance within public sector). Does not include Ombudsman. No. Absent from legal framework. (General)
Ombudsman involvement in implementation is specified by law No. Absent from legal framework. (General)
Reporting of data and/or implementation is required No. Absent from legal framework.

Legislation

Constitution of the Republic of Latvia of 1922_LAT (Latvian)pdf
Law on Official Secrets of 1996_LAT (Latvian)pdf
Personal Data Protection Law of 2018_LAT (Latvian)pdf
Administrative Procedure Law of 2001_LAT (Latvian)pdf
Freedom of Information Law of 1998_LAT (Latvian)pdf
Cabinet Regulation No. 445 of 2020_LAT (Latvian)pdf
Law on the Structure of the Cabinet of Ministers of 2008_LAT (Latvian)pdf
Law on Official Publications and Legal Information of 2012_LAT (Latvian)pdf
Law on Budget and Financial Management of 1994_LAT (Latvian)pdf
State Administration Structure Law of 2002_LAT (Latvian)pdf
Cabinet Regulation No. 940 of 2006_LAT (Latvian)pdf
Rules of Procedure of the Cabinet of Ministers of 2009_LAT (Latvian)pdf

*Last update: 2017


Public Procurement

The Latvian public procurement system is regulated primarily by the Public Procurement Law and the Law on Procurement for the Needs of Public Utilities Providers. The public procurement body is the Procurement Monitoring Bureau which is an organization under the Ministry of Finance.

The lowest minimum thresholds for conducting a public procurement tender are:

▪         LVL 4,000 (ca. EUR 5,500) for goods

▪         LVL 14,000 (ca. EUR 20,000) for works

▪         LVL 4,000 (ca. EUR 5,500)  for services

The minimum number of bidders is 2-3 for restricted procedures and 2-3 for negotiated and competitive dialog procedures. The minimum submission period is 30 days for open procedures, 25 days for restricted procedures and 25 for negotiated procedures from dispatch date. The final beneficial owners do not have to be disclosed when placing a bid.

There is no case for preferential treatment, but contracting authorities can prescribe environmental considerations through the evaluation criteria.

There are several options for bid exclusion: corruption, violation of environmental enactments, bankruptcy, liquidation, false information, outstanding tax or social security contribution. Bids can be also excluded because of abnormally low bid prices.

In the bid evaluation phase, there are conflict of interest restrictions on the composition of the evaluation committee. However, no form of independence of  the contracting authority is mandated for the evaluation committee.

There is a payable fee in case of an arbitration procedure, which depends on the object of the case. There is a standard court fee of EUR 28.46. Court decisions are publicly released.


Quantitative Data

Primary Metric

20122015201620172020Trend
Scope878776
Information availability88883
Evaluation88888875
Open competition67505033
Institutional arrangements36363629

Values lie in range between 0 and 100, higher values implying higher legislation comprehensiveness


Qualitative Data

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Scope

Threshold - lowest PP

What is the minimum contract value above which the public procurement law is applied? (Product type GOODS) EUR 10000. If the estimated value of a public supply contract or public service contract is EUR 10,000 or more, but less than EUR 42,000 and the estimated value of a public works contract is EUR 20,000 or more, but less than EUR 170,000, the contracting authority shall perform procurement in accordance with the procedures laid down in Art. 9 of the Public Procurement Law (simplified procedure below EU thresholds). Certain procurement procedures - i.e. 1) open procedure; 2) restricted procedure; 3) competitive procedure with negotiation; 4) competitive dialogue; 5) innovation partnership procedure; 6) negotiated procedure - only apply if the value of public supply contracts or of service contracts is EUR 42,000 or more and the value of public works contracts is EUR 170,000 or more. Additionally, EU thresholds apply. (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Arts. 8 (1) (4) (5) and 9 (1) Regulations of the Cabinet of Ministers No. 105 of 2017, as amended in 2019, Art. 2)
What is the minimum contract value above which the public procurement law is applied? (Product type WORKS) EUR 20000. If the estimated value of a public supply contract or public service contract is EUR 10,000 or more, but less than EUR 42,000 and the estimated value of a public works contract is EUR 20,000 or more, but less than EUR 170,000, the contracting authority shall perform procurement in accordance with the procedures laid down in Art. 9 of the Public Procurement Law (simplified procedure below EU thresholds). Certain procurement procedures - i.e. 1) open procedure; 2) restricted procedure; 3) competitive procedure with negotiation; 4) competitive dialogue; 5) innovation partnership procedure; 6) negotiated procedure - only apply if the value of public supply contracts or of service contracts is EUR 42,000 or more and the value of public works contracts is EUR 170,000 or more. Additionally, EU thresholds apply. (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Arts. 8 (1) (4) (5) and 9 (1) Regulations of the Cabinet of Ministers No. 105 of 2017, as amended in 2019, Art. 2)
What is the minimum contract value above which the public procurement law is applied? (Product type SERVICES) EUR 10000. If the estimated value of a public supply contract or public service contract is EUR 10,000 or more, but less than EUR 42,000 and the estimated value of a public works contract is EUR 20,000 or more, but less than EUR 170,000, the contracting authority shall perform procurement in accordance with the procedures laid down in Art. 9 of the Public Procurement Law (simplified procedure below EU thresholds). Certain procurement procedures - i.e. 1) open procedure; 2) restricted procedure; 3) competitive procedure with negotiation; 4) competitive dialogue; 5) innovation partnership procedure; 6) negotiated procedure - only apply if the value of public supply contracts or of service contracts is EUR 42,000 or more and the value of public works contracts is EUR 170,000 or more. Additionally, EU thresholds apply. (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Arts. 8 (1) (4) (5) and 9 (1) Regulations of the Cabinet of Ministers No. 105 of 2017, as amended in 2019, Art. 2)

Threshold - by PP type

What are the minimum application thresholds for the procurement type? (Entity: PUBLIC SECTOR) EUR 10000. (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Arts. 8 (1) (4) (5) and 9 (1) Regulations of the Cabinet of Ministers No. 105 of 2017, as amended in 2019, Art. 2)
What are the minimum application thresholds for the procurement type? (Entity: UTILITIES) EUR 428000. According to the Law on Procurement of Public Service (Utilities) EU thresholds apply. As of 2020, those are: EUR 428,00 for services and goods, and EUR 5,350,000 for works. (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Art. 3 (3) Law on Procurement of Public Service Providers (Utilities) of 2017, as amended in 2020, Art. 13 (1) (2) (4) (5) Regulations of the Cabinet of Ministers No. 105 of 2017, as amended in 2019, Art. 3 )
What are the minimum application thresholds for the procurement type? (Entity: DEFENCE) EUR 10000. The contracting authority which is a subject of the Public Procurement Law, shall apply the procurement procedures specified in Article 6 (3) and the procedure specified in Article 6 (7), both of the Law on Defence and Security Procurement, for awarding supply contracts or service contracts if their value is equal to or above EUR 42,000, and works contracts if their value is equal to or above EUR 170,000. The same procedures apply to contracts above EU thresholds. When concluding works, supply or service contracts, if their value is below the first thresholds mentioned, but equal to EUR 10,000 or more for supply and service contracts and equal to EUR 20,000 or more for works contracts, the contracting authority shall award public contracts following the provisions of Article 6 (9) (10). (Law on Defence and Security Procurement, as amended in 2020, Art. 6 (1))

Threshold - by product type

What are the minimum application thresholds for the procurement type? (Product type GOODS) EUR 10000. If the estimated value of a public supply contract or public service contract is EUR 10,000 or more, but less than EUR 42,000 and the estimated value of a public works contract is EUR 20,000 or more, but less than EUR 170,000, the contracting authority shall perform procurement in accordance with the procedures laid down in Art. 9 of the Public Procurement Law (simplified procedure below EU thresholds). Certain procurement procedures - i.e. 1) open procedure; 2) restricted procedure; 3) competitive procedure with negotiation; 4) competitive dialogue; 5) innovation partnership procedure; 6) negotiated procedure - only apply if the value of public supply contracts or of service contracts is EUR 42,000 or more and the value of public works contracts is EUR 170,000 or more. Additionally, EU thresholds apply. (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Arts. 8 (1) (4) (5) and 9 (1) Regulations of the Cabinet of Ministers No. 105 of 2017, as amended in 2019, Art. 2)
What are the minimum application thresholds for the procurement type? (Product type WORKS) EUR 20000. If the estimated value of a public supply contract or public service contract is EUR 10,000 or more, but less than EUR 42,000 and the estimated value of a public works contract is EUR 20,000 or more, but less than EUR 170,000, the contracting authority shall perform procurement in accordance with the procedures laid down in Art. 9 of the Public Procurement Law (simplified procedure below EU thresholds). Certain procurement procedures - i.e. 1) open procedure; 2) restricted procedure; 3) competitive procedure with negotiation; 4) competitive dialogue; 5) innovation partnership procedure; 6) negotiated procedure - only apply if the value of public supply contracts or of service contracts is EUR 42,000 or more and the value of public works contracts is EUR 170,000 or more. Additionally, EU thresholds apply. (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Arts. 8 (1) (4) (5) and 9 (1) Regulations of the Cabinet of Ministers No. 105 of 2017, as amended in 2019, Art. 2)
What are the minimum application thresholds for the procurement type? (Product type SERVICES) EUR 10000. If the estimated value of a public supply contract or public service contract is EUR 10,000 or more, but less than EUR 42,000 and the estimated value of a public works contract is EUR 20,000 or more, but less than EUR 170,000, the contracting authority shall perform procurement in accordance with the procedures laid down in Art. 9 of the Public Procurement Law (simplified procedure below EU thresholds). Certain procurement procedures - i.e. 1) open procedure; 2) restricted procedure; 3) competitive procedure with negotiation; 4) competitive dialogue; 5) innovation partnership procedure; 6) negotiated procedure - only apply if the value of public supply contracts or of service contracts is EUR 42,000 or more and the value of public works contracts is EUR 170,000 or more. Additionally, EU thresholds apply. (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Arts. 8 (1) (4) (5) and 9 (1) Regulations of the Cabinet of Ministers No. 105 of 2017, as amended in 2019, Art. 2)

Information availability

Publishing and record keeping

Is there a requirement that tender documents must published in full? Yes. The contracting authority shall ensure free and direct electronic access to the procurement procedure documents and all additional necessary documents in its buyer profile, as well as the possibility for bidders to become acquainted on site with the additional procurement documents to which free and direct electronic access cannot be ensured due to technical reasons or due to the information included therein, or for the purpose of protection of commercial interests, starting from the moment of the announcement of the relevant procurement. If the bidder requests to have procurement documents in printed form, the contracting authority shall issue them within 3 working days after receipt of the request, provided that the request for documents has been submitted in due time prior to the expiry of the term for submission of tenders. The contracting authority may charge a fee for the issue of the procurement procedure documents in printed form which shall not exceed the actual expenses of reproduction and sending of the documents. The contracting authority shall send additional information to the economic operator or the candidate who has asked the question, and shall concurrently insert this information on the buyer profile where the procurement procedure documents are available, indicating also the question asked. If the contracting authority has made amendments to the procurement procedure documents, it shall insert information on the amendments on the buyer profile, where these documents are available, not later than within one day after the modification or additional information notice has been submitted for publication to the Procurement Monitoring Bureau. For the failure to comply with the provisions included in the Procurement Law and the laws and regulations issued on its basis during preparation of applications, tenders, or designs in respect of ensuring the accessibility of procurement procedure documents, the issue of procurement procedure documents, or the provision of additional information, a warning or a fine from fourteen to seventy units of fine shall be imposed. (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Arts. 9 (16), 36 (1) (3) (4), 40 (3) and 88 (1) Law on Procurement of Public Service Providers (Utilities) of 2017, as amended in 2020, Arts. 36 (1) and 42 Law on Defence and Security Procurement, as amended in 2020, Arts. 12 and 38)
Are any of these documents published online at a central place? Yes. https://www.iub.gov.lv/lv (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Arts. 1 (23) (25) and 34 (2) Law on Procurement of Public Service Providers (Utilities) of 2017, as amended in 2020, Arts. 1 (24) (26) and 40 Law on Defence and Security Procurement, as amended in 2020, Arts. 1 (16) (18), 36 and 38 (1))
Is it mandatory to keep all of these records? -Public notices of bidding opportunities, -Bidding documents and addenda, -Bid opening records, -Bid evaluation reports, -Formal appeals by bidders and outcomes, -Final signed contract documents and addenda and amendments, -Claims and dispute resolutions, -Final payments, -Disbursement data (as required by the country’s financial management system) Yes. For general procurement, the contracting authority shall ensure the documentation of each stage of the procurement procedure and the documentation of the procurements referred to in Sections 9 and 10 of the Public Procurement Law, and also shall document the procurement procedure taking place by electronic means. A procurement procedure notice is a report reflecting the progress of the procurement procedure. The notice shall be prepared and published on the buyer profile regarding each procurement procedure after taking of a decision on the procurement procedure results, taking into account the procedures and content stipulated by the Cabinet. Minutes reflecting the progress of the procurement, the notice, procurement procedure documents, except for the tenders and applications, shall be generally accessible information. The contracting authority shall store all the originals of such documents, and also the originals of applications and tenders for 10 years after the conclusion of the procurement contract, conclusion of the framework agreement, or establishment of the dynamic purchasing system. For procurement in the utility sector, the contracting authority shall keep all original documents of the procurement procedure, as well as the originals of applications and tenders for not less than 3 years after the decision regarding the procurement procedure has been made. In the defence sector, the contracting authority shall keep all the original documents for 2 years after the end of the procurement contract. DEFENCE: for 5 years (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Art. 40 Law on Procurement of Public Service Providers (Utilities) of 2017, as amended in 2020, Art. 46 Law on Defence and Security Procurement, as amended in 2020, Art. 42 )
Are contracts awarded within a framework agreement published (ie mini contracts)? Yes. The contracting authority, within 10 working days after conclusion of a procurement contract or of a framework agreement or taking a decision to terminate or suspend the procurement procedure or not to establish a dynamic purchasing system, shall submit for publishing the contract award notice. The contracting authority may group contract award notices for procurement contracts being concluded based on the framework agreement on a quarterly basis and submit them for publishing within 10 working days of the end of each quarter. (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Art. 29 (1) Law on Procurement of Public Service Providers (Utilities) of 2017, as amended in 2020, Art. 38 (1) )

Sub-contracting

Is it mandatory to publish information on subcontractors (ie names) in some cases? No. The bidder must submit, alongside theirs, an European Single Procurement Document for each person on whose capacities it relies to certify that the qualification thereof complies with the requirements specified in the contract notice or procurement procedure documents. This applies to subcontractors indicated in the tender, if the value of the construction work to be performed or services to be provided by which is at least 10 per cent of the value of the procurement contract. Additionally, in order to ascertain that an economic operator will be able to perform a procurement contract, the contracting authority is entitled to request that the tenderer indicate in its tender those parts of the procurement contract which it will transfer to subcontractors for performance, and also all anticipated subcontractors. The contracting authority shall request that the tenderer indicate in its tender all those subcontractors, where the value of the construction work to be performed or the services to be provided by them is 10 per cent of the total value of the procurement contract or more, and the lot of the procurement contract to be transferred to each such subcontractor. Finally, information on subcontractors must be included in the contract. However, according to Article 40 (3) of the Public Procurement Law, none of those documents - applications, tenders and contracts - are made public. (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Arts. 40 (3), 49 (1), 60 and 63)
If yes, what is the threshold for publication (i.e. the % of total contract value subcontracted)? For example, if the threshold is 75%, and you have subcontracted out only 40% of your contract, no disclosure is required. Consultant will insert 75% in the short answer column. < >

Evaluation

Preferential treatment

Is there a ban on mentioning specific companies or brands in tender specification/call for tender? Yes. If it is not decisive for the existence of the subject-matter of the procurement contract, the technical specifications shall not specify a specific origin, special process characterising the products or services of only a specific economic operator, brand, patents or specific types of products creating advantages or a reason for the rejection of certain economic operators or products. Such reference may be included in exceptional cases if it is not possible to prepare a sufficiently precise and clear description of the subject-matter of the procurement contract in accordance with Paragraph five of this Section. In such case the reference shall be used together with the words "or equivalent". (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Art. 20 (6) Law on Procurement of Public Service Providers (Utilities) of 2017, as amended in 2020, Art. 23 (6) Law on Defence and Security Procurement, as amended in 2020, Art. 19 (9))
Is there a preferential treatment for small-to-medium enterprises (SMEs)? No. < >
Is there a preferential treatment for local/national companies? (companies from other EU MS are considered foreign companies) No. Public Procurement is based on the principles of free competition of economic operators, and also equal and fair treatment thereof. (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Art. 2 (2))
Is there a specific set of rules for green/sustainable procurement? Yes. The contracting authority may require the supplier to adhere to an environmental management system or observe specific environmental requirements, set most economically advantangeous tender (MEAT) criteria based on environmental considerations. There are specific MEAT rules for vehicle, food and catering procurement. Regulations of the Cabinet of Ministers No. 353 of 2017 specifies in great detail the requirements for green public procurement and procedures for their application. (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Arts. 1 (34), 19, 20, 46 (3) 8, 48 and 54 Regulations of the Cabinet of Ministers No. 353 of 2017, as amended in 2020 Law on Procurement of Public Service Providers (Utilities) of 2017, as amended in 2020, Arts. 1 (33), 21, 28, 54, 58 (1) 2 and 59 (2) Law on Defence and Security Procurement, as amended in 2020, Arts. 15 (1) 7, 17, 19 (2) and 24)

Bid evaluation

Are there restrictions on allowable grounds for tenderer exclusion? Yes. Some of the main allowable grounds for tenderer exclusion are: 1. conviction for: (a) setting up, directing, participating in or participating in an organized group or other criminal organization; (b) bribery, kickbacks, embezzlement of bribes, trading in influence; (c) fraud, embezzlement or money laundering; (d) terrorism, terrorist financing, the formation or organization of a terrorist group; e) human trafficking; (f) evasion of taxes or similar charges; 2. tax debts in Latvia or in the country where the bidder is registered or its permanent residence, or unpaid compulsory social security contributions exceeding a total of EUR 150; 3. ongoing insolvency proceedings; 4. conflicts of interest; 5. the candidate or tenderer has been found guilty of an infringement of competition law in the form of a horizontal cartel by a final decision of a competent authority or a court judgment; 6. infringement of labour law; 7. the candidate or tenderer has provided false information; 8. the candidate or tenderer is a legal person or an association of persons registered offshore; and 9. the owner or holder of more than 25% of the capital shares (stocks) of a candidate or tenderer registered in Latvia is a legal person or an association of persons registered offshore. In addition, specific exclusion grounds apply in the defence sector. (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Art. 42 Law on Procurement of Public Service Providers (Utilities) of 2017, as amended in 2020, Art. 48 Law on Defence and Security Procurement, as amended in 2020, Art. 44)
Are some bids automatically excluded? e.g., lowest/highest price; unusually low price, etc. Yes. In case of abnormally low tenders the contacting authority must request an explanation from the bidder regarding the price or costs. The contracting authority shall reject the tender as abnormally low if the provided explanation does not satisfactorily account for the low level of price or costs proposed by the tenderer, or if the price or costs do not cover the costs related to compliance with obligations laid down in the laws and regulations governing the fields of environmental, social, and labour law, and labour protection, and collective agreements. Additionally, the contracting authority shall reject the tender of the tenderer within an open or restricted procedure, if the contract price offered by the tenderer exceeds any of the following values: 1) the contract price specified by the contracting authority in the procurement procedure documents, if it is set as the tender conformity requirement; 2) 150% of the estimated contract price specified in the procurement procedure documents. (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Arts. 41 (11) and 53 Law on Procurement of Public Service Providers (Utilities) of 2017, as amended in 2020, Art. 59 (4) Law on Defence and Security Procurement, as amended in 2020, Art. 50 (1))
Is scoring criteria published? Yes. The contracting authority shall indicate in the procurement procedure documents all tender evaluation criteria in the order of importance thereof, the values of the criteria and, where appropriate, spread of values, and also the selection algorithm of a tender in accordance with these criteria and shall describe how each of the evaluation criteria indicated will be applied. (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Arts. 19, 26 (2), 41 (1) and 51 Law on Procurement of Public Service Providers (Utilities) of 2017, as amended in 2020, Arts. 28 and 57 Law on Defence and Security Procurement, as amended in 2020, Art. 12 (1) 8))
Are decisions always made by a committee? Yes. A procurement commission shall be established for each procurement separately or for a certain period of time, or as a permanently functioning body. When establishing the procurement commission, the contracting authority shall ensure that this commission is competent in the field where the procurement contract is being awarded. The procurement commission is entitled to invite experts, when performing its duties. The contracting authority shall establish a procurement commission in the composition of at least 3 members. In general procurement, if the estimated contract price of a procurement exceeds EUR 1,000,000, the contracting authority shall establish a procurement commission in the composition of at least 5 members. (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Art. 24 Law on Procurement of Public Service Providers (Utilities) of 2017, as amended in 2020, Art. 29 Law on Defence and Security Procurement, as amended in 2020, Art. 28)
Are there regulations on evaluation committee composition to prevent conflict of interest? Yes. A person preparing the procurement procedure documents (official or employee of the contracting authority), members of the procurement commission and experts may not represent the interests of a candidate or tenderer, and also may not be connected to the candidate or tenderer. Within the meaning of this Paragraph, a person preparing the procurement procedure documents (official or employee of the contracting authority), a member of the procurement commission and an expert is connected to a candidate or tenderer if he or she is: 1) the current or former employee, official, shareholder, stockholder, a proctor or member of a legal person - candidate, tenderer, or subcontractor, and if this connection with the legal person has terminated within the last 24 months; 2) the father, mother, grandmother, grandfather, child, grandchild, adoptee, adopter, brother, sister, half-brother, half-sister, or spouse (hereinafter - the relative) of a stockholder who owns at least 10 per cent of stocks, shareholder, proctor, or official of a legal person - candidate, tenderer, or subcontractor; 3) the relative of a natural person - candidate, tenderer, or subcontractor. (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Arts. 25 and 85 Law on Procurement of Public Service Providers (Utilities) of 2017, as amended in 2020, Arts. 30 and 91 Law on Defence and Security Procurement, as amended in 2020, Arts. 29 and 74)
Is some part of evaluation committee mandatorily independent of contracting authority? No. < >
Are scoring results publicly available? No. For procurement covered by the Law, the contracting authority shall use the sample notice form spcified by Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2015/1986 of 11 November 2015 establishing standard forms for the publication of notices in the field of public procurement and repealing Implementing Regulation (EU) No 842/2011. However, when announcing the results, the contracting authority is entitled to withhold certain information from publication in the notice, where its release would impede the application of laws and regulations or be contrary to the public interest, or would restrict competition among economic operators, or would harm the legitimate commercial interests (public or private) of economic operators. In the case of procurement not covered by the Public Procurement Law or in case of a negotiated procedure, the contracting authority may submit a voluntary notice on the procurement results. For design contests, the contracting authority shall, within 10 working days after notifying the participants of the design contest, submit the notice on the results for publishing. (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Arts. 30, 31 and 34 (1) (4) Law on Procurement of Public Service Providers (Utilities) of 2017, as amended in 2020, Arts. 39 and 40 Law on Defence and Security Procurement, as amended in 2020, Arts. 35 and 36)
Does the law specify under which conditions the tender can be cancelled? Yes. In the case of general procurement, the Law establishes that the contracting authority is entitled to suspend the procurement and not to award the procurement contract if it has an objective substantiation. In that sense, the contracting authority shall, within 3 working days following the taking of the decision to suspend the procurement, prepare and publish in the publication management system information on suspension of the procurement, specifying the date of taking and the justification for the decision (information shall be attached to the notice of the planned contract), and also shall ensure free and direct electronic access to this decision on its buyer profile. Applicable Regulations specify the exact conditions. The contracting authority shall take a decision to terminate the procurement procedure in any of the following cases, if in an open or closed tender: 1. no tenders or applications have been submitted; 2. the tenderers do not comply with the qualification requirements specified in the procurement procedure documents; 3. applications of candidates who do not meet the qualification requirements and are excluded from the procurement procedure have been submitted; 4. tenders which do not comply with the requirements specified in the procurement procedure documents have been submitted; 5. offers have been found to be unreasonably cheap. In the defence and security sector, the Law on Defence and Security Procurement is more specific and stipulates that: if the number of candidates who comply with the requirements referred to in Article 43 (2) is less than the specified number and the contracting authority considers that it is not possible to ensure sufficient competition, it may terminate the procurement procedure and announce a new procurement procedure by inviting the selected candidates to submit a tender or to participate in dialogue or negotiations, or to terminate the procurement procedure. Additionally, if no applications or tenders have been submitted for the specific procurement procedure or the submitted tenders or tenders do not comply with the specified requirements, the contracting authority shall take a decision to terminate the procurement procedure. In the utilities sector, the applicable Law covers hypotheses of early termination of the procurement contract, but not of the tender procedure. (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Arts. 9 (15) Regulations of the Cabinet of Ministers No. 107 of 2017 (as of 2020), Arts. 229 and 230 Law on Defence and Security Procurement, as amended in 2020, Arts. 43 (6) and 51)

Open competition

CFT publication

Does the law specify the location for publicizing open calls for tenders? Yes. OJEU/TED for tenders above EU thresholds and Procurement Monitoring Bureau's webpage (https://www.iub.gov.lv/lv) for tenders below EU thresholds (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Art. 34 Law on Procurement of Public Service Providers (Utilities) of 2017, as amended in 2020, Art. 40 Law on Defence and Security Procurement, as amended in 2020, Arts. 32 and 36)
Does the law specify the location for publicizing restricted calls for tenders? Yes. OJEU/TED for tenders above EU thresholds and Procurement Monitoring Bureau's webpage (https://www.iub.gov.lv/lv) for tenders below EU thresholds (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Art. 34 Law on Procurement of Public Service Providers (Utilities) of 2017, as amended in 2020, Art. 40 Law on Defence and Security Procurement, as amended in 2020, Arts. 32 and 36)
Does the law specify the location for publicizing negotiated calls for tenders? Yes. OJEU/TED for tenders above EU thresholds and Procurement Monitoring Bureau's webpage (https://www.iub.gov.lv/lv) for tenders below EU thresholds (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Art. 34 Law on Procurement of Public Service Providers (Utilities) of 2017, as amended in 2020, Art. 40 Law on Defence and Security Procurement, as amended in 2020, Arts. 32 and 36)

Minimum # of bidders

What is the minimum number of bidders for restricted procedures? 5. (Regulations of the Cabinet of Ministers No. 107 of 2017 (as of 2020), Art. 2.2 (29) Law on Defence and Security Procurement, as amended in 2020, Art. 18 )
What is the minimum number of bidders for negotiated procedures? 3. (Regulations of the Cabinet of Ministers No. 107 of 2017 (as of 2020), Art. 2.3 (66) Law on Defence and Security Procurement, as amended in 2020, Art. 18 )
What is the minimum number of bidders for competitive dialogue procedures? 3. (Regulations of the Cabinet of Ministers No. 107 of 2017 (as of 2020), Art. 2.4 (106) Law on Defence and Security Procurement, as amended in 2020, Art. 18 )

Bidding period length

What are the minimum number of days for open procedures? General. The minimum time limit for the submission of tenders shall be 35 days following the day when the Procurement Monitoring Bureau has sent the contract notice to the Publications Office of the European Union for publication thereof in the Official Journal of the European Union, if the estimated contract value is equal to or greater than EU thresholds. If the estimated contract value falls below EU thresholds, the minimum time limit for the submission of tenders shall be 20 days following the day when the contract notice has been posted on the website of the Procurement Monitoring Bureau. (Regulations of the Cabinet of Ministers No. 107 of 2017 (as of 2020), Art. 2.1 (3) )
What are the minimum number of days for restricted procedures? General. The minimum time limit for the submission of tenders shall be 30 days following the day when the invitation to tender has been sent to the candidates, if the estimated contract value is equal to or greater than EU thresholds. If the estimated contract value falls below EU thresholds, the minimum time limit for the submission of tenders shall be 20 days following the day when the invitation to tender has been sent to the candidates. (Regulations of the Cabinet of Ministers No. 107 of 2017 (as of 2020), Art. 2.2 (43) )
What are the minimum number of days  for competitive negotiated procedures? General. The minimum time limit for the submission of initial tenders shall be 30 days following the day when the invitation to submit initial tenders has been sent to the candidates, if the estimated contract value is equal to or greater than EU thresholds. If the estimated contract value falls below EU thresholds, the minimum time limit for the submission of initial tenders shall be 20 days following the day when the invitation to submit initial tenders has been sent to the candidates. (Regulations of the Cabinet of Ministers No. 107 of 2017 (as of 2020), Art. 2.3 (80) )

Institutional arrangements

Institutions and regulations

Does the law specify the main EXCEPTIONS preventing the application of the public procurement law for tenders/organisations? Yes. In short, main exceptions to the application of the Public Procurement Law include: 1) the purchase or lease of land, existing structure or other immovable property or the acquisition of other rights to such immovable property with any financial resources; 2) the purchase, development, production, or co-production of such broadcast material intended for audio and audio-visual electronic mass media services, if the contract is awarded by electronic mass media, or the contracts for the provision of transmission time or broadcasts that are awarded to electronic mass media; 3) arbitration and conciliation services; 4) document certification services provided by notaries; 5) legal services the providers of which are designated by a court or the providers of which are assigned by external laws and regulations to carry out specific tasks under the supervision of a court; 6) legal services related to the exercise of official authority; 7) the financial services related to the issue, purchase, sale, or transfer of securities or other financial instruments, services, and activities of the Bank of Latvia which are performed through the European Financial Stability Facility and the European Stability Mechanism; 8) the loans which are related or not related to the issue, sale, purchase, or transfer of securities or other financial instruments; 9) services of natural persons under the employment contracts; 10) services in the field of civil defence, civil protection, and disaster prevention which are provided by associations, foundations, or unions and to which specific CPV codes refer; 11) public passenger transport services by rail or metro; 12) services provided by another contracting authority or by an association of contracting authorities which, in accordance with external laws and regulations, have an exclusive right to provide the relevant service. Specific exceptions apply to the utilities and defence sectors. (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Arts. 3-7 and 9 Law on Procurement of Public Service Providers (Utilities) of 2017, as amended in 2020, Arts. 10, 11 and 12 Law on Defence and Security Procurement, as amended in 2020, Art. 4 )
Does the law specify the main types of institutions that must apply the public procurement law? Yes. Contracting authority is understood as a public person or institution thereof, an association in which all members are contracting authorities, a foundation all founders of which are contracting authorities, and also such legal person governed by private law which conforms with all of the following criteria: a) is established or operates in order to satisfy the needs of the public which are not of commercial or industrial nature; b) is subordinate to or under the decisive influence of a public person or authority thereof, or under the decisive influence of a legal person governed by private law meeting these criteria (this influence manifests as the majority of voting rights upon electing the members of the supervisory or executive authority or upon appointment of the management), or more than 50 per cent of financing for activities of such legal person governed by private law comes from the public person, authority thereof or another legal person governed by private law meeting these criteria. (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Art. 1 (19) Law on Procurement of Public Service Providers (Utilities) of 2017, as amended in 2020, Art. 1 (19) Law on Defence and Security Procurement, as amended in 2020, Art. 1 (12))
Does the law specify the main procedure types or procurement methods permitted? Yes. Simplified procurement procedure (below specific thresholds), open procedure (except in the defence sector), restricted procedure, negotiated procedure with or without prior notice, competitive dialogue, innovative partnership and design contest (the last two: except in the defence sector) (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Arts. 8 (1) (2) and 9 Law on Procurement of Public Service Providers (Utilities) of 2017, as amended in 2020, Art. 13 (1) Law on Defence and Security Procurement, as amended in 2020, Art. 6 (3))
Is there a procurement arbitration court dedicated to public procurement cases? Yes. Complaints regarding infringements of the procurement procedure shall be examined by the Complaint Examination Commission (or Review Commission) consisting of three members and established by the Procurement Monitoring Bureau. Members of the commission shall be the officials of the Procurement Monitoring Bureau. The chairperson of the commission shall conform to the criteria referred to in Paragraph two of this Section, and at least one more member of the commission shall have an academic or a second level higher vocational education in law. In order to examine complaints, the Procurement Monitoring Bureau may invite a procurement specialist or expert. A decision of the Complaint Examination Commission may be appealed in the District Administrative Court in accordance with the procedures laid down in the Administrative Procedure Law. The matter shall be heard by the court in the composition of three judges. A ruling of the District Administrative Court may be appealed in accordance with cassation procedures in the Department of Administrative Cases of the Supreme Court. (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Arts. 9 (23), 67 (1) and 72 (1) Law on Procurement of Public Service Providers (Utilities) of 2017, as amended in 2020, Arts. 71 and 76 (1) Law on Defence and Security Procurement, as amended in 2020, Arts. 62 (1) and 66 (1))
Is there a procurement regulatory body dedicated to public procurement? Yes. Procurement Monitoring Bureau (Iepirkumu uzraudzības birojs). (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Arts. 65, 66 and 89 Law on Procurement of Public Service Providers (Utilities) of 2017, as amended in 2020, Arts. 70 and 95 Law on Defence and Security Procurement, as amended in 2020, Arts. 61 and 78)
Does the law specify procurement advisors' profession (i.e. degree to be obtained, official list of members of the professional association) and its role in the tendering process (e.g. right to draft tender documentations, conduct market research identifying bidders)? No. However, the Public Procurement Law provides that at least one member of the Complaint Examination Commission (or Review Commission) must have a Law degree, and that the chairperson must have a degree in Law, Economics or Management, as well as at least one-year experience in examination of complaints regarding infringements of the procurement procedure. (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Art. 67 (1) (2))
Is disclosure of final, beneficial owners required for placing a bid? No. < >

Complaints

Is there a fee for arbitration procedure? Yes. When submitting a complaint in accordance with the procedures laid down in Article 68 of the Procurement Law, a deposit shall be paid in or submitted. The deposit shall comprise 0.5 per cent of the estimated contract value, however not exceeding EUR 15,000 in case of a public works contract and EUR 840 in case of a public service contract or supply contract. If it is not possible to determine the estimated contract value or it is not specified in the procurement procedure documents, in the case of a public works contract the deposit shall be EUR 3,400, but in the case of a public service contract and supply contract - EUR 840. If an appeal is lodged with the District Administrative Court against the decision of the Complaint Examination Commission, a state fee in the amount of EUR 30 shall be paid. (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Art. 70 (1) (3) Law on Procurement of Public Service Providers (Utilities) of 2017, as amended in 2020, Art. 74 (3) Administrative Procedure Law of 2004, as amended in 2017, Art. 124 (1))
Is there a ban on contract signature until arbitration court decision (first instance court)? No. There is a ban on contract signature during the so-called "waiting period" which can go up to 15 days from the notification of tender results to bidders. However, there is no automatic suspension of the tender procedure, including of contract signature, while the Complaint Examination Commission reviews the complaint. The Commission may determine a suspension, but it is not automatic. More specifically, the Law explicitly states that an appeal against a decision of the Complaint Examination Commission shall not suspend the decision's operation. (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Arts. 60 (6) (7) and 72 (3) Law on Procurement of Public Service Providers (Utilities) of 2017, as amended in 2020, Arts. 65 (6) (7) and 76 (3) Law on Defence and Security Procurement, as amended in 2020, Arts. 54 (2) (3) and 66 (3))
What is the maximum number of days until arbitration court decision from filing a complaint in the case of awarded contracts? General. The Complaint Examination Commission shall examine a complaint within one month after receipt thereof in the Procurement Monitoring Bureau. If due to objective reasons it is not possible to observe this time limit, the commission may extend it by notifying the submitter of the complaint, the tenderer whose tender has been selected in accordance with the specified tender evaluation criteria and the contracting authority thereof. (Law on Public Procurement of 2016, as amended in 2020, Art. 71 (1) Law on Procurement of Public Service Providers (Utilities) of 2017, as amended in 2020, Art. 75 (1) Law on Defence and Security Procurement, as amended in 2020, Art. 65 (1))
Is there a requirement to publicly release arbitration court decisions ? No. There is no explicit rule requiring it, but the Procurement Monitoring Bureau decisions on the subject matter are published online: https://info.iub.gov.lv/lv/meklet/pt/complaint/. Court judgments can also be found online: https://manas.tiesas.lv/eTiesasMvc/nolemumi.

Legislation

Administrative Procedure Law of 2004 (Latvian)pdf
Law No. 173 of 2011 on Defence and Security Procurement (Latvian)pdf
Law No. 254.1 of 2016 on Public Procurement (Latvian)pdf
Law No. 36.1 of 2017 on Procurement of Public Service Providers (Utilities) (Latvian)pdf
Regulations of the Cabinet of Ministers No. 105 (2017/45.6) (Latvian)pdf
Regulations of the Cabinet of Ministers No. 107 (2017/45.8) (Latvian)pdf
Regulations of the Cabinet of Ministers No. 353 (2017/129.2) (Latvian)pdf

*Last update: 2017